SOME ANTARCTIC COLLECTIONS

Launched: 29 November 2002. Last updated: 22 February 2011.

Some instituitional collections of Antarcticana are very well-known, Scott Polar Research Institute in Cambridge and New Zealand's Canterbury Museum, for example. Others are unexpected or found in unlikely places. Included below are some of the latter.



INDEX OF COLLECTIONS:

The Catalogue of The Library of the Antarctic Circle, Jaffrey, NH.
Antipodean Books offers up a big collection.
Australian Antarctic Division - Books in Special Collections. Hobart, Tasmania.
Brown University, Providence, RI - Bradford Swan Collection
Brown University, Providence, RI - 1967 Antarctic Exhibition at the John Carter Brown Library
Brown University, Providence, RI - The John Carter Brown Library's copy of 'Aurora Australis.'
Byrd Polar Research Center Archival Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.
Canterbury Museum. Christchurch, New Zealand.
Columbia University's Libris Polaris
George Marston collection
National Library of Australia - Hurley Diaries and Photographs
National Library of Scotland - Mountaineering and Polar Collections
Peabody Essex Museum - A. H. Waite Collection
Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery, Plymouth, Devon, UK.
The Archives of the Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge, UK.
"Freeze Frame," Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge, UK.
The Griffith Taylor Collection, University of New England, Armidale, N.S.W., Australia.



ANTIPODEAN BOOKS AT THE BOSTON BOOK FAIR

At the Boston Antiquarian Book Fair this past Friday (14 November 2008), David and Cathy Lilburne (Antipodean Books) featured an Antarctic collection that is both extensive and impressive. It was developed by collector Michael Shuman and is now for sale through Antipodean Books for an asking price of $350,000.
The highpoint is a very nice copy of the Aurora Australis but most every important title that deserves to be in an Antarctic collection is included as well.
The Antarctic Circle shies away from anything of a commercial nature but in this instance it seems appropriate to make known the availability of a collection of note.
To view a description and listing of the collection (pdf)
click here.


David and Cathy holding the Aurora Australis at the recent Boston Book Fair.
Some but by means not all of the collection is arrayed behind them.



AUSTRALIAN ANTARCTIC DIVISION - BOOKS IN SPECIAL COLLECTIONS

[The books are listed by title. In most cases Arctic holdings have been left out. Also left out are most Australian or other low-latitude titles. Duplicates--seemingly of the same edition--have been excluded although the accession numbers have been included.]
Library Catalogue as of 07 March 2001. The Accession number of the book is at the end enclosed in brackets

'Birdie' Bowers of the Antarctic. Seaver, George (1938). John Murray [A99/262] [A99/210]

15,000 miles in a ketch. Du Baty, Raymond Rallier (1910). Thomas Nelson [A99/066]

A directory for the navigation of the Indian Ocean, with descriptions of its coasts, islands, etc., from the Cape of Good Hope to the Strait of Sunda and Western Australia, including also the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf: the winds, monsoons, and currents, and the passages from Europe to its various ports. Findlay, Alexander George (1897). Richard Holmes Laurie [A99/093]

A for Antarctica. Chester, Jonathan (1994). Margaret Hamilton Books [A95/231]

A for Antarctica: facts and stories from the frozen south. Hooper, Meredith (1991). Piccolo Books [A94/233]

A man for Antarctica: the early life of Phillip Law. Ralston, Kathleen (1993). Hyland House [A01/065]

A naturalist at the poles: the life, work and voyages of Dr. W.S. Bruce the polar explorer. Brown, R.N. Rudmose (1923). Seeley, Service & Co. [A1389] [A6115]

A visit to Nansen. And, Adventure. Whitehouse, J.H. + Shackleton, E.H. (1928). Oxford University Press [A99/187]

A voyage of discovery and research in the Southern and Antarctic regions, during the years 1839-43. Volume 1. Ross, James Clark (1847). John Murray [A99/147] [A99/124] [A4382]

A voyage of discovery and research in the Southern and Antarctic regions, during the years 1839-43. Volume II. Ross, James Clark (1847). John Murray [A99/125] [A99/148] [A4383]

A voyage towards the South Pole, and round the world. Performed in His Majesty's Ships the "Resolution" and "Adventure", in the years 1772, 1773, 1774, and 1775. Volume I. Cook, James (1777). Printed for W. Strahan and T. Cadell [A73]

A voyage towards the South Pole, and round the world. Performed in His Majesty's Ships the "Resolution" and "Adventure", in the years 1772, 1773, 1774, and 1775. Volume II. Cook, James (1777). Printed for W. Strahan and T. Cadell [A74]

A voyage towards the South Pole, performed in the years 1822-24. Containing an examination of the Antarctic Sea, to the seventy-fourth degree of latitude: and a visit to Tierra del Fuego, with a particular account of the inhabitants. Weddell, James (1825). Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green [A2125]

A.N.A.R.E. song book. (195-?). [A99/424]

ANARE: Australia's Antarctic outposts. Law, Phillip + Bechervaise, John (1957). Oxford University Press [A99/284]

Acquisition of sovereignty over polar areas. Smedal, Gustav (1931). I Kommisjon hos Jacob Dybwad [A232] [A99/001]

Alfresco Flight: the RAAF Antarctic experience. Wilson, David (1991). Royal Australian Air Force Museum [A92/242] [A92/242]

Alone. Byrd, Richard E. (1938). G.P. Putnam's Sons [A99/265] [A2825]

An account in two volumes of two voyages to the South Seas to Australia, New Zealand, Oceania 1826-1829 in the corvette Astrolabe and to the Straits of Magellan, Chile, Oceania, South East Asia, Australia, Antarctica, New Zealand and Torres Strait 1837-1840 in the corvettes "Astrolabe" and "Zelee". Volume I: "Astrolabe" 1826-1829. Dumont D'Urville, Jules S-C (1987). Melbourne University Press [A18843] [A18844]

An autobiography. Mill, Hugh Robert (1951). Longmans, Green and Co. [A99/104] [A99/106] [A99/105]

An historical account of the circumnavigation of the globe, and of the progress of discovery in the Pacific Ocean, from the voyage of Magellan to the death of Cook. (1837). Oliver and Boyd [A99/037]

Antarctic adventure: Scott's northern party. Priestley, Raymond E. (1914). T. Fisher Unwin [A99/272] [A99/232]

Antarctic adventure and research. Taylor, Griffith (1930). D. Appleton and Co. [A99/277] [A99/003]

Antarctic artefacts: a selective description and annotated catalogue of artefacts in The Mawson Collection at The University of Adelaide. Ferguson, Richard G. (1995). The University of Adelaide [A95/213]

Antarctic days: sketches of the homely side of polar life by two of Shackleton's men. Murray, James + Marston, George (1913). Andrew Melrose [A99/250] [A1144]

Antarctic discovery: the story of the Second Byrd Antarctic Expedition. Byrd, Richard Evelyn (1936). Putnam [A49]

Antarctic journal. Hasick, David James Dr (1993). Era Publications [A94/368]

Antarctic papers: Climatic relations between Antarctica and Australia: The Antarctic cruise of the "Discovery", 1929-1930: Unsolved problems of the Antarctic exploration and research: The flight from Alaska to Spitsbergen, 1928 and the preliminary flights of 1926 and 1927. Taylor, Griffith + Mawson, Douglas + Wilkins, Hubert (192-?). [A99/019]

Antarctic papers: Macquarie Island and its future: Macquarie Island, a sanctuary for Australasian sub-Antarctic fauna: Voyage of the "Mary and Sally" to Macquarie Island for the purpose of obtianing sea elephant oil and seal skins: The "Norvegia" expedition and Bouvet Island: Antarctic whaling and exploration. Mawson, Douglas + Crowther, W.L. + Aagaard, Bjarne (1919-). [A99/021]

Antarctic papers: The Antarctic cruise of the "Discovery", 1929-1930: the "Norvegia" Antarctic expedition of 1929-1930: Wilkes Land rediscovered: Visibility and the discovery of Polar Lands: Norwegian explorations in the Antarctic, 1930-1931: The flight to Marie Byrd Land: The Eastern landfalls of Wilkes within the Australian sector of the Antarctic: Discovery of a new sketch of Cape Hudson in the Antarctic: Australia's Antarctic Dependency: Future exploration of the African Quadrant. Mawson, Douglas + Riiser-Larsen, Hjalmar + Hobbs, W.H. + Isachsen, Gunnar + Byrd, Richard E. + Davis, J.K. (193-). [A99/023]

Antarctic papers: The B.A.N.Z. Antarctic Research Expedition 1929-31: The new polar province: The unveiling of Antarctica: Wilkes's Antarctic landfalls. Mawson, Douglas (193-?). [A99/020]

Antarctic papers: The third commission of the R.R.S "Discovery II": Antarctic research by the Norvegia expeditions and others: Observations on certain Antarctic icebergs. Mackintosh, N.A. + Holtedadh, Olaf + Wordie, J.M. + Kemp, Stanley (193-?). [A99/018]

Antarctic penguins: a study of their social habits. Levick, G. Murray (1914). William Heinemann [A99/223]

Antarctic pilot. Supplement no. 5 to First edition. (1936). H.M.S.O. for the Hydrographic Department [A99/025]

Antarctic pilot. Supplement no. 6 to First edition. (1937). H.M.S.O. for Hyrdrographic Department [A99/026]

Antarctic pilot. Supplement no. 7 to First edition. (1938). H.M.S.O. for the Hydrographic Department [A99/027]

Antarctic survival. Swan, Robert (1987). Macdonald [A90/596]

Antarctic symphony (sound recording). Australian Broadcasting Corporation (1993). Australian Broadcasting Corporation [A95/065]

Antarctic voyages: the diary of three voyages as Second Mate on S.Y. "Aurora". Gray, Percival (1914). [A3882]

Antarctica. (1965). Methuen [A10641]

Antarctica. Cowcher, Helen (1990). Georgian House [A90/887]

Antarctica: Australia's remote medical practice. Lugg, D.J. (1993). Antarctic Division [A01/207]

Antarctica: a treatise on the southern continent. Hayes, J. Gordon (1928). Richards Press [A99/253] [A244] [A99/201 ]

Antarctica: or two years amongst the ice of the South Pole. Nordenskjold, N. Otto G. + Andersson, Joh. Gunnar (1905). Hurst and Blackett [A99/255] [A1137]

Antarctica and back in sixty days. Bowden, Tim (1991). ABC Enterprises for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation [A99/214]

Antarctica in the International Geophysical Year: based on a symposium on the Antarctic. Crary, A.P. + Gould, L.M. + Hulbert, E.O. + Odishaw, Hugh + Smith, Waldo E. (1956). American Geophysical Union [A99/295]

Antarctica. Volume 1. The nature of transcendence. Shirakawa, Yoshikazu (1994). [in Japanese] [A94/357]

Antarctica. Volume 2: Space-time of eternity. Shirakawa, Yoshikazu (1994). [A95/047]

Antarktis: eine Reise ans Ende der Welt. Sattlberger, Chris (1996). Christian Brandstatter Verlag [A97/085]

Argonauts of the South, being a narrative of voyagings and polar seas and adventures in the Antarctic with Sir Douglas Mawson and Sir Ernest Shackleton. Hurley, Frank (1925). G.P. Putnam's Sons [A99/010] [A99/254] [A8270 ]

Aurora Australis. Shackleton, E.H. (1988). Bay Books [A88/335]

Australia in the Antarctic: interest, activity and endeavour. Swan, R.A. (1961). Melbourne University Press [A99/011]

Australian Antarctic Dependency papers, 1933. (1933). [A99/030]

Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition, 1949-50: operations orders and instructions. Australia. Dept. of External Affairs (1949?). [A99/032]

Australian dictionary of dates and men of the time: containing the history of Australasia from 1542 to date. Heaton, J.H. (1879). S.W. Silver & Co. [A99/012]

Beyond horizons. Ellsworth, Lincoln (1938). Doubleday, Doran & Co. [A99/014]

Beyond the furious fifties, Antarctic & Subantarctic: paintings. Bone, Catherine (2000). Mercury-Walch [A00/504]

Blizzard and fire: a year at Mawson, Antarctica. Bechervaise, John (1963). Angus and Robertson [A99/015] [99/266]

British Graham Land Expedition, 1934-37. Rymill, J.R. (1938). [A99/031]

British polar explorers. Evans, Edward (1943). William Collins [A99/017]

Captain Cook's three voyages round the world. Low, Charles R. (1880). Routledge [A804]

Captain Scott. Gwynn, Stephen (1939). Allen Lane [A00/129]

Castaway on the Auckland Isles: a narrative of the wreck of the "Grafton" and of the escape of the crew after twenty months' suffering. Musgrave, Thomas (1866). Lockwood [A12091] [A99/035]

Catalogue of B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. Expedition negatives. Hurley, F.J. (193-?). [A1414]

Centenary celebration: the Wilkes Exploring Expedition of the United States Navy 1838-1842, and Symposium on American Polar Exploration February 23-24, 1940. (1940). American Philosophical Society [A99/183]

Cherish the sea: a history of sail. Varende, Jean de la (1955). Sidgwick and Jackson Limited [A99/036]

Christopher Columbus: admiral of the ocean sea. Morison, Samuel Eliot (1940). Humphrey Milford [A99/037]

Contributions to the study of Antarctic surface features by photogeographical methods. Roscoe, John H. (1952). Reconnaissance Branch, Collection Operations Division, Directorate of Intelligence, Headquarters, U.S. Air Force [A3042] [A2722]

Cook and the opening of the Pacific. Williamson, James A. (1946). Hodder & Stoughton Limited for the English Universities Press [A99/039]

Dampferhandbuch fur den Atlantischen Ozean. (1905). L. Friederichsen & co. [A99/041]

Den gamle hvalfangst: kapitler av dens historie. Aagaard, Bjarne (1933). Gyldendal Norsk forlag [A99/072]

Diary of the Terra Nova Expedition to the Antarctic 1910-1912: an account of Scott's last expedition. Wilson, Edward (1972). Blandford Press [A11691]

Die Internationale Polarforschung 1882-1883: Die Beobachtungs-Ergebnisse der deutschen Stationen. Band II: Sud-Georgien und das magnetische Observatorium der kaiserlichen Marine in Wilhelmshaven. (1886). Verlag von A. Asher [A99/287] [A99/286]

Discovery reports. Volume I, pp. 1-140, plates I-VI: Station list 1925-1927. (1929). University Press [A99/054]

Discovery reports. Volume I, pp.141-232, plates VII-XVIII: Discovery investigations objects, equipment and methods. Kemp, S. + Hardy, A.C. + Mackintosh, N.A. (1929). University Press [A99/056] [A99/055]

Discovery reports. Volume X, pp.283-382. Plates XII-XXV, Chart I: The South Orkney Islands. Marr, James W.S. (1935). [A99/057]

Discovery reports. Volume XIX, pp. 285-296, plates LXIX-XCV: Distribution of the pack-ice in the Southern Ocean. Mackintosh, N.A. + Herdman, H.F.P. (1940). University Press [A99/058]

Discovery reports. Volume XIX, pp.165-184, plates XXXIV-XXXVIII: MacRobertson Land and Kemp Land, 1936 with a report on rock specimens. Rayner, George W. + Tilley, C.E. (1940). University Press [A99/058]

Djuren i farg: Daggdjur - Kraldjur - Groddjur. Curry-Lindahl, Kai (1960). Almqvist & Wiksell [A99/293]

Douglas Mawson. Taylor, Griffith (1962). Oxford University Press [A99/279]

Edward Kidson: late Director of Meteorological Services in New Zealand. Kidson, Isabel M. (1941). Whitcombe & Tombs Limited [A99/046]

Edward Wilson: nature-lover. Seaver, George (1937). John Murray [A99/267]

Edward Wilson of the Antarctic: naturalist and friend. Seaver, George (1933). John Murray [A99/262]

Enigmas: another book of unexplained facts. Gould, Rupert T. (1929). Philip Allan & Co. Ltd. [A99/048]

Essays and studies. Osborne, W.A. (1946). Lothian Publishing [A99/049]

Explanations and sailing directions to accompany the wind and current charts approved by Captain D.N. Ingraham. Volume I. Maury, M.F. (1858). William A. Harris [A99/139]

Explanations and sailing directions to accompany the wind and current charts, approved by Captain D.N. Ingraham. Volume II. Maury, M.F. (1859). Cornelius Wendell [A99/140]

Explorers of the Antarctic. Hobbs, William Herbert (1941). House of Field [A99/278]

Extracts from the Geographical journal: January 1933, October 1933, January 1934, February 1934, May 1934, March 1939 and April 1941. (1933-). [A99/024]

Falkland Islands: contract for the construction of a steel screw whale marking vessel with general conditions, specification and form of tender. (1924). Office of the Crown Agents for the Colonies [A99/061] Falkland Isles: specification of repairs and alterations to Antarctic research S.S. "Discovery". (1923). Office of the Crown Agents for the Colonies [A99/061]

First on the Antarctic continent: being an account of the British Antarctic Expedition 1898-1900. Borchgrevink, C.E. (1901). George Newnes [A1436]

First on the Antarctic continent, being an account of the British Antarctic Expedition 1898-1900. Borchgrevink, C.E. (1901). George Newnes [A99/076]

Flying the Arctic. Wilkins, George H. (1928). Grosset & Dunlap [A99/215]

Forgotten islands of the South Pacific: the story of New Zealand's Southern Islands. Redwood, Rosaline (1950). A.H. and A.W. Reed [A99/069]

Fourteen men: story of the Australian Antarctic Expedition to Heard Island. Scholes, Arthur (1949). F.W. Cheshire [A16807]

From Edinburgh to the Antarctic: an artist's notes and sketches during the Dundee Antarctic Expedition of 1892-93. Murdoch, W.G. Burn (1894). Longmans, Green [A4378]

Geography around us. Book 2. Lower, Christine + Folley, Lynn (1991). Macmillan [A99/282]

Going to extremes: Project Blizzard and Australia's Antarctic heritage. Chester, Jonathan (1986). Doubleday Australia Pty Ltd [A89/559]

Great adventures and explorations: from the earliest times to the present, as told by the explorers themselves. (1947). Dial Press [A99/073]

Great true adventures in ice and snow. (1957). Arco Publications Limited [A99/074]

Handbook and index to accompany a map of Antarctica. Bayliss, E.P. + Cumpston, J.S. (1939). Dept. of External Affairs [A99/102] [A99/101]

Handbook of the Antarctic Treaty System. Heap, John (1989). Polar Publications at the Scott Polar Research Institute [A89/267]

Heard Island and McDonald Islands nomination by the Government of Australia for inscriptionon the World Heritage list 1996. Australian Antarctic Division (1996). [Australian Antarctic Division] [A96/181]

High latitude. Davis, J.K. (1962). Melbourne University Press [A99/204] [A99/775]

Hints to travellers: scientific and general. Volume I: Surveying and practical astronomy. (1906). Royal Geographical Society [A99/217]

Hints to travellers: scientific and general. Volume I: Surveying and practical astronomy. (1901). Royal Geographical Society [A6428]

Hints to travellers: scientific and general. Volume I: Surveying and practical astronomy. (1906). Royal Geographical Society [A99/081]

Hints to travellers: scientific and general. Volume II: Meteorology, photography, geology, natural history, anthropology, industry and commerce, archaeology, medical, etc.. (1906). Royal Geographical Society [A99/082]

Historical documentation of Old Casey Station, Antarctica 1989/90. Part 1. Clark, Linda + Wishart, Elspeth ([1992]). [Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery] [A92/357]

Historical documentation of Old Casey Station, Antarctica 1989/90. Part 2. Clark, Linda + Wishart, Elspeth ([1992]). [Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery] [A92/358]

Historical documentation of Old Casey Station, Antarctica 1989/90. Part 3. Clark, Linda + Wishart, Elspeth ([1992]). [Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery] [A92/359]

Historical documentation of Old Casey station, Antarctica 1989/90. Part 4. Clark, Linda + Wishart, Elspeth ([1992]). [Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery] [A92/360]

History of geography. Keltie, J. Scott + Howarth, O.J.R. (1913). Watts & Co. [A99/084]

Home and away with Douglas Mawson. Boston, Paquita (1998). Gascoyne Printers [A99/663]

Huskies in harness: a love story in Antarctica. Robinson, Shelagh (1995). Kangaroo Press [A98/115] [A98/236]

Huskies: polar sledge dogs. Chester, Jonathan (1994). Margaret Hamilton Books [A94/454]

Ice and its natural history. Buchanan, John Young (1908). William Clowes & Sons [A99/086]

In search of a polar continent 1905-1907. Harrison, Alfred H. (1908). Edward Arnold [A99/092]

Into the frozen South. Marr, Scout (1924). Cassell and Company [A99/094]

Japanese Antarctic research Expedition 1959: [album of photographs of Syowa Base]. (1959). [A8024]

Journey to Antarctica. Hooper, Meredith (1997). Scholastic Australia [A98/094]

Le pourquoi-pas? dans l'Antarctique: journal de la deuxieme expedition au Pole Sud 1908-1910. Charcot, Jean (1910). [A99/274]

Life and letters of Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker: based on materials collected and arranged by Lady Hooker. Volume I. Huxley, Leonard (1918). John Murray [A99/095]

Life and letters of Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker: based on materials collected and arranged by Lady Hooker. Volume II. Huxley, Leonard (1918). John Murray [A99/096]

Life in the freezer: a natural history of the Antarctic. Fothergill, Alastair (1993). BBC Books [A96/201]

Lloyd's calendar, 1941. (1941). Lloyd's [A99/099]

Lloyd's register of British and foreign shipping from 1st July, 1898, to the 30th June, 1899. Volume II: Sailing vessels. (1898). Lloyds [A99/144]

Log book of an Antarctic journey: our voyage on the Russian icebreaker Kapitan Khlebnikov. Higgins, Lois (1994). Hartys Creek Press [A95/051]

Log letters from "The Challenger". Campbell, George (1876). Macmillan & Co. [A99/292]

Log-letters from "The Challenger". Campbell, George (1877). Macmillan [A213] [A99/100]

London atlas map of the Antarctic regions. (19-?). Edward Stanford [A99/302]

Macquarie Island. Cumpston, J.S. (1968). Australia. Department of External Affairs. Antarctic Division [A97/321]

Magnetic polar journey 1912. Webb, Eric N. (1965). [A99/108] [A99/109 ]

Mammals of the ice. Stewardson, Carolyn L. (1997). Sedona Publishing [A98/112]

Mawson of the Antarctic: the life of Sir Douglas Mawson. Mawson, Paquita (1964). Longmans [A99/103] [A99/269]

Mawson's Antarctic diaries. Mawson, Douglas Sir (1988). A Susan Haynes Book * Allen & Unwin Australia [A88/369]

Mawson's papers: a guide to the scientific, personal and business papers of Sir Douglas Mawson, OBE, BE, DSc, FRS, FAA, 1882-1958. Professor of Geology and Mineralogy, Antarctic scientist and explorer.. Innes, Margaret (1990). The Mawson Institute for Antarctic Research, The University of Adelaide [A91/181]

Meteorology: British Antarctic Expedition 1907-1909 under the command of Sir E.H. Shackleton: reports on the scientific investigations. Kidson, Edward (1910). Government Printer [A99/016]

Modern whaling and bear hunting: a record of present day whaling with up-to-date appliances in many parts of the world, and of bear and seal hunting in the Arctic regions. Murdoch, W.G. Burn (1917). Seeley, Service & Co. [A99/107]

Murihiku and the Southern Islands: a history of the West Coast Sounds, Foveaux Strait, Stewart Island, the Snares, Bounty, Antipodes, Auckland, Campbell and Macquarie Islands, from 1770 to 1829. McNab, Robert (1907). William Smith [A99/112]

My last expedition to the Antarctic 1936-1937 with a review of the research work done on the voyages in 1927-1937: a lecture delivered before the Norwegian Geographical Society, September 22nd, 1937. Christensen, Lars (1938). Johan Grundt Tanum [A99/110]

My last expedition to the Antarctic 1936-1937, with a review of the research work done on the voyages in 1927-1937. Christensen, Lars (1938). Johan Grundt Tanum [A3429 ]

Mysteries of the ocean wanderers. Video. Parer, David + Parer-Cook, Elizabeth (1993). Australian Broadcasting Corporation [A95/477]

Narrative of discovery and adventure in the polar seas and regions, with illustrations of their climate, geology and natural history, and an account of the whale-fishery.. Leslie, Sir John + Jameson, Robert + Murray, Hugh (1845). Oliver & Boyd / Simpkin, Marshal & Co. [A41]

Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition: during the years 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842. Atlas. Wilkes, Charles (1845). Lea & Blanchard [A11815]

Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition: during the years 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842. Volume I. Wilkes, Charles (1845). Lea & Blanchard [A11810]

Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition: during the years 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842. Volume II. Wilkes, Charles (1845). Lea & Blanchard [A11811]

Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition: during the years 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842. Volume III. Wilkes, Charles (1845). Lea & Blanchard [A11812]

Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition: during the years 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842. Volume IV. Wilkes, Charles (1845). Lea & Blanchard [A11813]

Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition: during the years 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842. Volume V. Wilkes, Charles (1845). Lea & Blanchard [A11814]

Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition during the years 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842. Volume I. Wilkes, Charles (1852). Ingram, Cooke, and Co. [A6548] [A56]

Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition, during the years 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842. Volume II. Wilkes, Charles (1852). Ingram, Cooke, and Co. [A58] [A6549]

Nomination of Macquarie Island by the Government of Australia for inscription on the World Heritage List 1996. Department of the Environment, Sport and Territories + Parks and Wildlife Service Tasmania (1996). [Australian Antarctic Division] [A96/180]

Notable pathfinders to Antarctica. Currey, C.H. (1941). Whitcombe & Tombs [A99/280]

Notes by a naturalist: an account of observations made during the voyage of H.M.S. "Challenger" round the world in the years 1872-1876 under the command of Capt. Sir G.S. Nares, R.N., K.C.B., F.R.S. and Capt. F.T. Thomson, R.N.. Moseley, H.N. (1892). John Murray [A4961]

Notes by a naturalist on the "Challenger": being an account of various observations made during the voyage of H.M.S. "Challenger" round the world in the years 1872-1876, under the commands of Capt. Sir G.S. Nares and Capt. F.T. Thomson. Moseley, H.N. (1879). Macmillan [A00/131]

Notes on the botany of the Antarctic Voyage conducted by Captain James Clark Ros R.N. F.R.S. in Her Majesty's ships Erebus and Terror, with observations on the Tussac Grass of the Falkland Islands. Hooker, Sir W.J. (1843). H. Bailliere [A11604] [A11604]

Ocean birds. Green, J.F. (1887). R.H. Porter [A11817]

Of myths and mariners: a study of doubtful islands and of extraordinary ice phenomena, as reported in high southern latitudes by sealers, whalers and other mariners exploring and exploiting those ice-bound waters during the nineteenth century and before. Swan, R.A. (1998). R.A. Swan [A98/410]

Our fantastic planet: circling the globe via the Poles with Dick Smith. Smith, Dick (1991). Australian Geographic [A99/285]

Pacific horizons: the exploration of the Pacific before Captain Cook. Lloyd, Christopher (1946). George Allen and Unwin [A99/122]

Pandora's last voyage. Rawson, Geoffrey (1963). Longmans, Green and Co. [A99/123]

Papers on Antarctica: Swedish Antarctic Expedition, 1902-3: German Antarctic Expedition, 1902-3: Second French Antarctic Expedition: Australasian Antarctic Expedition, 1911-14: The Weddell sea - an historical retrospect: Meteorology of the Weddell Quadrant during 1912: The geographical work of the future: Antarctica and some of its problems: The future of polar exploration: Recent Antarctic exploration. (1904-). [A99/022]

Peary. Hobbs, William Herbert (1936). Macmillan Company [A99/126]

Polar exploration. Bruce, William S. (1911?). Williams & Norgate [A99/221] [A99/130 ]

Polar papers [a collection of the Geographical Journal from 1879 to 1896, excluding 1888-1894]. (). [A99/131]

Polar papers [a collection of the Geographical Journal from 1891 to 1894]. (). [A99/132]

Polar papers [a collection of the Geographical Journal from 1899 to 1902]. (). [A99/133]

Polar papers [a collection of the Geographical Journal from 1903 to 1913]. (). [A99/134]

Polar papers [including items from the Edinburgh review, The Arctic Expedition of 1875-6 by R. Johnston, and miscellaneous items]. (). [A99/135]

Problems of polar research: a series of papers. (1928). American Geographical Society [A99/247]

Protegeons l'eau. Victor, Paul Emile (1978). Fernand Nathan [A99/301]

Quinze mois dans l'Antarctique. Gerlache de Gomery, Adrien de (1902). Hachette [A10948]

Reflections on distant ice. Johnson, Lawrence E. ([1991]). [A91/245]

Report by Director of Fisheries on fishing experiments carried out by the F.I.S. "Endeavour", for period 12th March to 7th September, 1909. Australia. Parliament (1909). [A99/068]

Report by Director of Fisheries on fishing experiments carried out by the F.I.S. "Endeavour", for period 12th March to 7th September, 1909. Australia. Parliament (1909). [A99/067] Report of the Interdepartmental Committee on Research and Development in the Dependencies of the Falkland Islands, April, 1920. (1920). H.M.S.O. [A99/198]

Report of the Interdepartmental Committee on Research and Development in the Dependencies of the Falkland Islands, April, 1920. (1920). H.M.S.O. [A99/200]

Report on the collections of natural history made in the Antarctic regions during the voyage of the "Southern Cross". (1902). British Museum (Natural History) [A12571] [A1145] [A10457 ]

Report on the progress of the Discovery Committee's investigations. (1937). University Press [A99/059] [A99/060 ]

Roald Amundsen - my life as an explorer. Amundsen, Roald (1927). William Heinemann [A99/113]

Safe passage questioned: medical care and safety for the polar tourist. Levinson, John M. + Ger, Errol (1998). Cornell Maritime Press [A98/077] [A98/077]

Sailing the world's edge: sea stories from Old Sydney. Dunbabin, Thomas (1931). Jonathan Cape [A99/152] Scientific travel in Antarctica. Taylor, Griffith (1926). Martinus Nijhoff [A99/165]

Scott's last expedition: the personal journals of Captain R.F. Scott, R.N., C.V.O., on his journey to the South Pole. Scott, R.F. (1923). John Murray [A99/222]

Scott's last expedition. Volume I: Being the journals of Captain R.F. Scott, R.N., C.V.O.. (1913). Macmillan and Co. [A99/157]

Scott's last expedition. Volume I: Being the journals of Captain R.F. Scott, R.N., C.V.O.. Scott, R.F. (1914). John Murray [A79]

Scott's last expedition. Volume I: Being the journals of Captain R.F. Scott, R.N., C.V.O.. Scott, R.F. (1913). Smith, Elder & Co. [A99/251]

Scott's last expedition. Volume II: Being the reports of the journeys and the scientific work undertaken by Dr. E.A. Wilson and the surviving members of the expedition. (1913). Macmillan [A99/283] [A99/158]

Scott's last expedition. Volume II: Being the reports of the journeys and the scientific work undertaken by Dr. E.A. Wilson and the surviving members of the expedition. (1913). Smith, Elder & Co. [A99/252]

Scott's last expedition. Volume II: Being the reports of the journeys and the scientific work undertaken by Dr. E.A. Wilson and the surviving members of the expedition. (1914). John Murray [A80 ]

Shackleton. Fisher, Margery + Fisher, James (1957). Barrie [A99/259 ]

Shackleton: a memory. Begbie, Harold (1922). Mills & Boon Ltd [A99/154]

Shackleton's argonauts: a saga of the Antarctic ice-packs. Hurley, Frank (1948). Angus & Robertson [A99/153] [A8270]

Shackleton's last voyage: the story of the "Quest": from the official journal and private diary kept by Dr. A.H. Macklin. Wild, Frank (1923). Cassell [A217] [A99/256]

Ships and seamen. Rawson, Geoffrey (1934). Thornton Butterworth Ltd. [A99/169]

Shores of Macquarie Island. Bennett, Isobel (1971). Rigby Limited [A11455]

Sir Hubert Wilkins: enigma of exploration. Grierson, John (1960). Robert Hale Limited [A99/193]

Sonder-Abdruck aus der Zeitschrift fur Gletscherkunde (Band V) fur Eiszeitforschung und Geschichte des Klimas. (1910). Verlag von Gebruder Borntraeger [A99/087]

South: man and nature in Antarctica: a New Zealand view. Billing, Graham + Mannering, Guy (1964). A.H. & A.W. Reed [A99/171]

South: the story of Shackleton's 1914-1917 expedition. Shackleton, Ernest (1922). William Heinemann [A99/291] [A99/273] South: the story of Shackleton's last expedition 1914-1917. Shackleton, Ernest (1919). William Heinemann [A11157] [A99/227]

South latitude. Ommanney, F.D. (1940). Readers Union Limited by arrangement with Longmans, Green & Co. [A99/172] South latitude. Ommanney, F.D. (1938). Longmans, Green & Co. [A99/260]

South with Scott. Evans, Edward R.G.R. (1921). W. Collins Sons & Co. [A99/290] [A99/230]

Southern Ocean cruising handbook. Poncet, Sally + Poncet, Jerome (1991). Sally and Jerome Poncet [A92/335]

Southern lights: the official account of the British Graham Land Expedition 1934-1937. Rymill, John (1938). Chatto and Windus [A5902] [A99/173] [A99/249 ]

Stepping stones to the South Pole. Nichol, J.R. (1948). Angus and Robertson [A99/174]

Stories of exploration and discovery. Archer, Arthur B. (1915). University Press [A99/050]

Subantarctic Macquarie Island: environment and biology. Selkirk, P.M. + Seppelt, R.D. + Selkirk, D.R. (1990). Cambridge University Press [A99/213]

Such is the Antarctic. Christensen, Lars (1935). Hodder and Stoughton [A6121]

Text book of topographical and geographical surveying. Close, C.F. (1905). H.M.S.O. [A99/175]

The Challenger foraminifera. Jones, Robert Wynn (1994). Oxford University Press for The Natural History Museum, London [A95/293]

The Antarctic Ocean. Owen, Russell (1941). Whittlesey House [A99/005]

The Antarctic book: winter quarters 1907-1909. (1909). William Heinemann [A66]

The Antarctic dictionary: a complete guide to Antarctic English. Hince, Bernadette (2000). CSIRO Publishing and Museum of Victoria [AOO/516]

The Antarctic manual for the use of the expedition of 1901. (1901). Royal Geographical Society [A99/004] [A1139]

The Antarctic pilot, comprising the coasts of Antarctica and all islands southward of the usual route of vessels. (1930). H.M.S.O. for the Hydrographic Department [A99/006]

The Antarctic problem: an historical and political study. Christie, E.W. Hunter (1951). George Allen & Unwin [A99/007]

The Antarctic regions. Fricker, Karl (1900). Swan Sonnenschein & Co. [A1140]

The Antarctic today: a mid-century survey by the New Zealand Antarctic Society. (1952). A.H. & A.W. Reed in conjunction with the New Zealand Antarctic Society [A4707] [A2254] [A4707]

The Australian Geographic book of Antarctica. Scott, Keith (1993). Australian Geographic Pty Ltd [A94/215]

The Cape Horn breed: my experiences as an apprentice in sail in the full-rigged ship "British Isles". Jones, William H.S. + Stephensen, P.R. (1956). Andrew Melrose [A99/033]

The Polar book. (1930). E. Allom & Co. Ltd. [A99/304]

The Ross Sea Shore Party 1914-17. Richards, R.W. (1962). Scott Polar Research Institute [A99/162]

The South Polar Times. Volume I: April to August 1902. (1907). Smith, Elder & Co. [A9561]

The South Polar Times. Volume II: April to August 1903. (1907). Smith, Elder & Co. [A9562]

The South Polar Times. Volume III: April to October 1911. (1914). Smith, Elder & Co. [A9563]

The South Pole: an account of the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition in the "Fram", 1910-1912. Volume I. Amundsen, Roald (1912). John Murray [A11635] [A81] [A99/228]

The South Pole: an account of the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition in the "Fram", 1910-1912. Volume II. Amundsen, Roald (1912). John Murray [A82] [A11636] [A99/229]

The Subantarctic islands of New Zealand: reports on the geo-physics, geology, zoology, and botany of the islands lying to the south of New Zealand, based mainly on observations and collections made during an expedition in the Government Steamer "Hinemoa" (Captain J. Bollons) in November, 1907. Volume I. (1909). Philosophical Institute of Canterbury [A1385]

The Subantarctic Islands of New Zealand: reports on the geo-physcis, geology, zoology, and botany of the islands lying to the south of New Zealand, based mainly on observations and collections made during an expedition in the Government Steamer "Hinemoa" (Captain J. Bollons) in November, 1907/ Volume II. (1909). Philosophical Institute of Canterbury [A1386]

The Victorian historical magazine. Index: Vols. 1 to 25 nos. 1 to 100 1911-1954. (1956). Royal Historical Society of Victoria [A99/182]

The ancient mariners: seafarers and sea fighters of the Mediterranean in ancient times. Casson, Lionel (1959). Victor Gollancz Ltd [A99/002]

The blue chameleon. Scholes, Katherine (1989). Hill of Content [A89/639] [A89/638]

The coldest place on earth. Thomson, R.B. (1969). A.H. & A.W. Reed [A18736]

The conquest of the South Pole: Antarctic exploration 1906-1931. Hayes, J. Gordon (1932). Thornton Butterworth [A99/038]

The cruise of Her Majesty's Ship "Challenger": voyages over many seas, scenes in many lands. Spry, W.J.J. (1876). Sampson Low, Marston, Searle, & Rivington [A62]

The cruise of the "Antarctic" to the South Polar regions. Bull, H.J. (1896). Edward Arnold [A1152]

The cruise of the "Cachalot": round the world after sperm whales. Bullen, Frank T. (1902). Macmillan [A2327]

The depths of the sea: an account of the general results of the dredging cruises of H.M.SS. "Porcupine" and "Lightning" during the summers of 1868, 1869, and 1870, under the scientific direction of Dr. Carpenter, J. Gwyn Jeffreys, and Dr. Wyville Thomson. Thomson, C. Wyville (1874). Macmillan and Co. [A99/042]

The desolate Antarctic. Mountevans, Lord (1950). Lutterworth Press [A99/043]

The discoveries of Antarctica within the American Sector, as revealed by maps and documents. Hobbs, William Herbert (1939). American Philosophical Society [A99/199]

The emerald whaler. Laubenstein, William J. (1960). Andre Deutsch [A99/047]

The explorations of Antarctica: the last unspoilt continent. Fogg, G.E. Professor (1990). Cassell [A98/050]

The far South. Bechervaise, John (1961). Angus and Robertson [A99/065]

The geography of the polar regions consisting of a general characterization of polar nature / A regional geography of the Arctic and the Antarctic. Nordenskjold, Otto + Mecking, Ludwig (1928). American Geographical Society [A99/248]

The great white South: or with Scott in the Antarctic. Ponting, Herbert G. (1921). G. Duckworth & Co. [A99/211]

The great White South: or with Scott in the Antarctic, being an account of experiences with Captain Scott's South Pole expedition and of the nature life of the Antarctic. Ponting, Herbert G. (1923). Duckworth [A6596] [A99/270]

The heart of the Antarctic: being the story of the British Antarctic Expedition 1907-1909. Volume I. Shackleton, E.H. (1909). William Heinemann [A99/136] [A12538] [A11155] [A99/238]

The heart of the Antarctic: being the story of the British Antarctic Expedition 1907-1909. Volume II. Shackleton, E.H. (1909). William Heinemann [A99/212] [A99/137] [A99/239] [A99/240] [A11156]

The home of the blizzard: being the story of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition, 1911-1914. Mawson, Douglas (1934). Hodder and Stoughton [A6120]

The home of the blizzard: being the story of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition, 1911-1914. Volume I. Mawson, Douglas (1915). William Heinemann [A99/241] [A86] [A7445] [A99/218] [A99/051]

The home of the blizzard: being the story of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition, 1911-1914. Volume II. Mawson, Douglas (1915). William Heinemann [A99/220] [A7446] [A99/219] [A87] [A99/242] [A99/052]

The life of Sir Ernest Shackleton. Mill, Hugh Robert (1923). William Heinemann [A99/098]

The life of Sir John Franklin, R.N.. Traill, H.D. (1896). John Murray [A99/070]

The loneliest mountain: the dramatic story of the first expedition to climb Mt Minto, Antarctica. Hall, Lincoln (1989). Simon & Schuster Australia [A89/535]

The marine observer: the review of the Marine Division of the Meteorological Office, in co-operation with Voluntary Marine Observers. Volume IX, 1932. (1932). Meteorological Committee, Air Ministry [A99/141]

The meanings of Sir Douglas Mawson's antarctic object collections. Wheeler, Barbara (1993). [A95/352]

The photographic collection of the Australian Antarctic Division: a report prepared for the Australian Archives on the condition and management of the Australian Antarctic Division's photographic collection. Storage and Preservation Section, Central Office, Australian Archives (1990). [Australian Archives] [A90/956]

The physical geography of the sea, and its meteorology. Maury, M.F. (1869). Sampson Low, Son & Marston [A99/127]

The polar book. (1930). E. Allom & Co. [A99/129]

The polar regions. Richardson, John (1861). Adam and Charles Black [A40]

The polar regions in the twentieth century: their discovery and industrial evolution. Greely, A.W. (1929). George G. Harrap [A99/149]

The polar world: a popular description of man and nature in the Arctic and Antarctic regions of the globe. Hartwig, G. (1874). Longmans, Green [A1156]

The realm of nature: an outline of physiography. Mill, Hugh Robert (1908). John Murray [A99/179]

The siege of the South Pole: the story of Antarctic exploration. Mill, Hugh Robert (1905). Alston Rivers [A99/167] [A99/168]

The silence calling: Australians in Antarctica 1947-97: The ANARE Jubilee history. Bowden, Tim (1997). Allen & Unwin [A97/182]

The songs of the "Morning". Doorly, Gerald S. (1943). Bread and Cheese Club [A6135]

The south polar times. Volume I: April to August 1902. (1907). Smith, Elder & Co. [A99/145]

The south polar times. Volume II: April to August 1903. (1907). Smith, Elder & Co. [A99/146]

The students' flora of New Zealand and the outlying islands. Kirk, Thomas (1899). John Mackay, Government Printer [A756] [A738]

The topographical results of Ellsworth's trans-Antarctic flight of 1935. Joerg, W.L.G. (1936). American Geographical Society [A99/176]

The true lies of W.F. Williams: a diary of the second voyage of the "Nimrod" to the Antarctic Dec 1 1908- March 10, 1909. Williams, William Frederick ([1909]). [A01/104]

The vegetation of the Chatham-Islands. Mueller, Ferdinand (1864). John Ferres, Government Printer [A11634]

The voyage of Captain Bellingshausen to the Antarctic Seas 1819-1821. Volume I. (1945). Hakluyt Society [A215] [A99/184]

The voyage of Captain Bellingshausen to the Antarctic Seas 1819-1821. Volume II. (1945). Hakluyt Society [A216] [A99/185]

The voyage of the "Discovery". Volume I. Scott, Robert F. (1907). Smith, Elder & Co. [A75]

The voyage of the "Discovery". Volume I. Scott, Robert F. (1905). Macmillan and Co. [A99/296]

The voyage of the "Discovery". Volume I. Scott, Robert F. (1905). Smith, Elder & Co. [A99/186] [A8737]

The voyage of the "Discovery". Volume II. Scott, Robert F. (1905). Macmillan [A99/297]

The voyage of the "Discovery". Volume II. Scott, Robert F. (1907). Smith, Elder & Co. [A76]

The voyage of the "Discovery". Volume II. Scott, Robert F. (1905). Smith, Elder & Co. [A8738]

The voyage of the "Scotia": being the record of a voyage of exploration in Antarctic seas. (1906). William Blackwood and Sons [A9573] [A99/077]

The voyage of the "Why not?" in the Antarctic: the journal of the second French South Polar Expedition, 1908-1910. Charcot, Jean (1911). Hodder and Stoughton [A6108]

The voyage of the "Why not?" in the Antarctic: the journal of the second French South Polar Expedition, 1908-1910. Charcot, Jean (1911?). Hodder and Stoughton [A99/192]

The voyages of Captain Scott: retold from "The Voyage of the "Discovery" and "Scott's last expedition". Turley, Charles (1914). Smith, Elder & Co. [A3883]

The voyages of the "Morning". Doorly, Gerald S. (1916). Smith, Elder & Co. [A9574]

The voyages of the Discovery: the illustrated history of Scott's ship. Savours, Ann (1992). Virgin [A92/289]

The white road: a survey of polar exploration. Kirwan, L.P. (1959). Hollis & Carter [A99/191]

The wicked mate: the Antarctic diary of Victor Campbell. An account of the Northern Party on Captain Scott's last expedition from the original manuscript in the Queen Elizabeth II Library, Memorial University of Newfoundland. Campbell, Victor (1988). [A88/339]

The worst journey in the world: Antarctic 1910-13. Cherry-Garrard, Apsley (1948). Penguin Books [A99/307]

The worst journey in the world: Antarctic 1910-1913. Volume I. Cherry-Garrard, Apsley (1922). Constable and Co. [A3474]

The worst journey in the world: Antarctic 1910-1913. Volume II. Cherry-Garrard, Apsley (1922). Constable and Co. [A3475]

Through the first Antarctic night 1898-1899: a narrative of the voyage of the "Belgica" among newly discovered lands and over an unknown sea about the South Pole. Cook, Frederick A. (1900). William Heinemann [A1131]

To the South Polar regions: Expedition of 1898-1900. Bernacchi, Louis (1901). Hurst and Blackett [A99/231] [A342]

To the frozen South. Villiers, A.J. (1924). Davies Brothers Limited [A99/178]

Two below zero: a year alone in Antarctica. McIntyre, Don + Meredith, Peter (1996). Australian Geographic [A96/356]

Two below zero: a year alone in Antarctica. Video. McIntyre, Don + McIntyre, Margie (1996). A McIntyre Marine Services Pty Ltd Production [A96/361]

Two years in the Antarctic: being a narrative of the British National Antarctic Expedition. Armitage, Albert B. (1905). Edward Arnold [A1158]

Verbatim copy of diary kept by R.W. Richards from February 23, 1916, to March 19, 1916, during the Shackleton Transantarctic Expedition 1914-17. Richards, R.W. (1963?). [A99/166]

Voices. Wignell, Edel (1990). Era Publications [A94/369]

Voyage au Pole Sud et dans L'Oceanie sur les corvettes "L'Astrolabe" et "La Zelee", execute par ordre du Roi pendant les annees 1837-1838-1839-1840. Tome X. Dumont-D'Urville, M.J. (1846). Gide [A1384 ]

Voyage au Pole Sud et dans L'Oceanie sur les corvettes "l'Astrolabe" et la "Zelee", execute par ordre du Roi pendant les annees 1837-1838-1839-1840. Tome I: Histoire du voyage. Dumont d'Urville, M. J. (1841). Gide [A1375]

Voyage au Pole Sud et dans l"Oceanie sur les corvettes "L'Astrolabe" et "La Zelee", execute par ordre du Roi pendant les annees 1837-1838-1839-1840. Tome IX: Histoire du voyage. Dumont-D'Urville, M.J. (1846). Gide [A1383]

Voyage au Pole Sud et dans l'Oceanie sur les corvettes "L'Astrolabe" et "La Zelee", execute par ordre du Roi pendant les annees 1837-1838-1839-1840. Tome II: Histoire du voyage. Dumont d'Urville, M.J. (1842). Gide [A1376]

Voyage au Pole Sud et dans l'Oceanie sur les corvettes "L'Astrolabe" et "La Zelee", execute par ordre du Roi pendant les annees 1837-1838-1839-1840. Tome VIII. Dumont D'Urville, M.J. (1845). Gide [A1382]

Voyage au Pole Sud et dans l'Oceanie sur les corvettes "L'Astrolabe"et "La Zelee" execute par ordre du Roi pendant les annees 1837-1838-1839-1840. Tome IV: Histoire du voyage. Dumont d'Urville, M.J. (1842). Gide [A1378]

Voyage au Pole Sud et dans l'Oceanie sur les corvettes "l"Astrolabe" et "La Zelee", execute par ordre du Roi pendant les annees 1837-1838-1839-1840. Tome VI: Histoire du voyage. Dumont D'Urville, M.J. (1844). Gide [A1380]

Voyage au Pole Sud et dans l'Oceanie sur les corvettes "l'Astrolabe" et "La Zelee", execute par ordre du Roi pendant les annees 1837-1838-1839-1840. Tome III. Dumont D'Urville, M.J. (18442). Gide [A1377]

Voyage au Pole Sud et dans l'Oceanie sur les corvettes "l'Astrolabe" et "La Zelee", execute par ordre du Roi pendant les annees 1837-1838-1839-1840. Tome V: Histoire du voyage. Dumont d'Urville, M.J. (1843). Gide [A1379]

Voyage au Pole Sud et dans l'Oceanie sur les corvettes "l'Astrolabe" et "La Zelee", execute par ordre du Roi pendant les annees 1837-1838-1839-1840. Tome VII. Dumont D'Urville, M.J. (1844). Gide [A1381]

Voyages in search of the north-west passage: from the collection of Richard Hakluyt. Hakluyt, Richard (1886). Cassell & Co. [A99/116]

Voyages of discovery in the Arctic and Antarctic seas, and round the world: being personal narratives of attempts to reach the North and South Poles, and of an open-boat expedition up the Wellington Channel in search of Sir John Franklin and Her Majesty's ships "Erebus" and "Terror" in Her Majesty's boat "Forlorn Hope". Volume 1. M'Cormick, R. (1884). Sampson Low, Marston, Searle, and Rivington [A1126]

Voyages of discovery in the Arctic and Antarctic seas, and round the world: being personal narratives of attempts to reach the North and South poles, and of an open-boat expedition up the Wellington Channel in search of Sir John Franklin and Her Majesty's ships "Erebus" and "Terror", in Her Majesty's boat "Forlorn Hope". Vol. II. M'Cormick, R. (1884). Sampson Low, Marston, Searle, and Rivington [A1127]

WYTOY WYSSA: The Antarctic Wives & Kinfolk Association of Australia: an overview of 25 years. Butterworth, Fay (1990). Antarctic Wives & Kinfolk Association of Australia [99/281]

Whaling in the Antarctic. Bennett, A.G. (1931). Wm. Blackwood [A68 ]

With Scott: the silver lining. Taylor, Griffith (1916). Smith, Elder & Co. [A99/237] [A99/078] [A99/245] [A7576]

With Scott to the Pole. Marshall, Howard (1936). Country Life Limited [A242]

With the "Aurora" in the Antarctic 1911-1914. Davis, John King (1919). Andrew Melrose [A99/053] [A99/224]

Wrecked on a reef, or, twenty months in the Auckland Isles: a true story of shipwreck, adventure, and suffering. (1896). T. Nelson and Sons [A3549]

You have to be lucky: Antarctic and other adventures. Law, Phillip (1995). Kangaroo Press [A01/064]

l'Avventura Antartica immagini e storia. Audisio, Aldo (1990). Museo Nazionale della Montagna [A91/208]



BROWN UNIVERSITY, SWAN COLLECTION, ANTARCTIC BOOKS (ORDERED BY ACCESSION NUMBER)
"In 1996, the Bradford Swan Antarctic Collection was transferred from the John Carter Brown Library to the John Hay. The 225 titles in the original donation have now been catalogued, and in the four years that Antarctic exploration has been a collecting interest of the John Hay, 150 titles have been purchased to supplement Mr. Swan's original collection and to provide reference materials for researchers using the Antarctic materials."
--From the Hay Library Webpage.

Web address of library: http://www.brown.edu/Facilities/University_Library/libs/hay/collections/index.htm

Swan Collection: http://library.brown.edu/search/aSwan+Antarctic+Collection+(Brown+University)/aswan+antarctic+collection+brown+university/-5,-1,0,B/exact&FF=aswan+antarctic+collection+brown+university&1,203

The Brown University Library On-Line Catalogue is called 'Josiah.'

John Hay Library
Brown University
Box A
20 Prospect Street
Providence, Rhode Island 02912 USA
Tel: 401-863-2146
Fax: 401-863-2093
E-mail: hay@brown.edu
      "The John Hay Library houses most of the University's rare books, manuscripts, special collections and archives."

About Bradford F. Swan:

Bradford F. Swan (1907-1976) was the theater/arts critic of the Providence Journal-Bulletin ". . . and for decades one of Rhode Island's most prominent arbiters of taste in the arts. . . . [His] professional career and private life was marked by a wide range of acquired interests which he pursued with devotion until his death. These included painting, theater, the dance, mountain climbing, botany, book collecting, historical research, fine food and wine." He was a member of the American Alpine Club and was the editor of Appalachia, the journal of the Appalachian Mountain Club. "During his college years, Mr. Swan became a book collector and took great interest in H. L. Mencken. Mr. Swan formed the first important collection of Mencken's works and maintained a correspondence with the writer until Mencken's death. Mr. Swan later contributed the collection to Yale. Among his gifts to the John Carter Brown Library was a collection of books on Antarctica, which he had visited and in which he retained a lifelong interest. He also presented many rare editions of the Bay Psalm Book to the Library. . . . He was the author of a number of historical scholarly works, including 'New Bedford in 1827: the Missing Diary of Samuel Rodman,' 'Captain Alexander Winsor,' 'A Bibliography of Henry Blake Fuller,' 'Gregory Dexter, London Printer,' 'Auctioning Alice' and 'The Ruysch Map of the World, 1507-1508.' A former president of the Rhode Island Historical Society and the Providence Art Club, he was a trustee of the Yale Library Associates, and a member of the American Antiquarian Society, the Bibliographical Society in London, the Bibliographical Society of America, John Carter Brown Library Associates and Friends of the Brown University Library."
--Largely from an obituary that appeared in the February 25, 1976 issue of The Evening Bulletin.

* Flat piece.

SWAN GIFT 1967:

Cherry-Garrard. The Worst Journey in the World. London, [1922]. 2v. 67-56-01

Borchgrevink. First on the Antarctic Continent. London, 1901. 67-56-02

Bernacchi. To the South Polar Regions, Expedition . . . London, 1901. 67-56-03

Bernacchi. A Very Gallant Gentleman. London, [1933]. 67-56-04

Rymill. Southern Lights: The Official Account of the . . . London, [1939]. 67-56-05

Stefansson. The Friendly Arctic: The Story of Five . . . London,1921. 67-56-06

Burn-Murdoch. From Edinburgh to the Antarctic. London, 1894. 67-56-07

Evans. South with Scott: Rear Admiral E.R.G.R. Evans. London, 1921. 67-56-08

Evans. South with Scott. London, 1921. 67-56-09

Christensen. Such is the Antarctic. London, 1935. 67-56-10

Brown. The Voyage of the "Scotia" Being the Record . . . Edinburgh, 1906. 67-56-11

Brown. A Naturalist at the Poles. London, 1923. 67-56-12

Byrd. Little America: Aerial Exploration in the . . . New York, 1930 67-56-13

Byrd. Discovery: The Story of the Second Byrd . . . New York, 1935. 67-56-14

Cherry-Garrard. The Worst Journey in the World. London, 1951. 67-56-15

Cherry-Garrard. The Worst Journey in the World. New York, 1930. 67-56-16

Balch. Antarctica. Philadelphia, 1902. 67-56-17

Fricker. The Antarctic Regions. New York, 1900. 67-56-18

Canterbury College (Univ. of New Zealand). Records. Christchurch, NZ. 67-56-19

Amundsen. The South Pole, An Account of the Norwegian . . . New York, 1913. 2 v. 67-56-20

British Polar Expedition (1930). Exhibition Committee . . . [London, 1930] 67-56-21

Doorly. The Voyages of the 'Morning.' London, 1916. 67-56-22

[Bernacchi] The Polar Book. London, [ 1930?]. 67-56-23

Scott. The Voyage of the Discovery. London, 1905. 2 vols. 67-56-24

The South Polar Times. Prospectus. [London, 1907]. 67-56-25*

The South Polar Times. Vol. I-III. London, [1907-1914]. 67-56-26

Priestley. Antarctic Adventure: Scott's Northern . . . London, [1914]. 67-56-28

Armitage. Two Years in the Antarctic. London, 1905. 67-56-29

Hanssen. The Voyages of a Modern Viking. London, 1936. 67-56-30

Bernacchi. Saga of the "Discovery". London, [1938]. 67-56-31

Wright. The Ross Barrier and the Mechanism of Ice. [London, 1925]. Pamphlet. 67-56-32

Byrd. Alone. New York, 1938. 67-56-34

Hurley. Argonauts of the South. New York, 1925. 67-56-35

Hussey. South with Shackleton. London, [1949]. 67-56-36

Hussey. South with Shackleton. London, [1951]. 67-56-37

Joyce. The South Polar Trail. London, 1929. 67-56-38

Lansing. Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage. New York, [1959]. 67-56-39

Marr. Into the Frozen South . . . the Quest. London, 1923. 67-56-40

Mawson. The Home of the Blizzard. London, [1931]. 67-56-41

Richards. Scott Polar Research Inst. Spec. Pub. No. 2. The Ross Sea Shore Party 1914-1917. Cambridge, 1962. 67-56-42

Seaver. Edward Wilson of the Antarctic, Naturalist. London, [1933]. 67-56-43

Seaver. 'Birdie'Bowers of the Antarctic. London, [1938]. 67-56-44

Shackleton. South: The Story of Shackleton's Last Expedition, 1914-1917. New York, 1926. 67-56-45

Shackleton. South: The Story of Shackleton's Last . . . New York, 1920. 67-56-46

Shackleton The Heart of the Antarctic. London, 1909. 2 vols. (500L) 67-56-47

Taylor. With Scott: The Silver Lining. London, 1916. 67-56-48

Worsley. Endurance: An Epic of Polar Adventure. London, 1931. 67-56-49

Nordenskjold. Antarctica or Two Years Among the . . . London, 1905. 67-56-50

[Antarctic Scrapbook: collected portraits, clippings, etc.]. 67-56-51

Bursey. Antarctic Night. London, [1958]. 67-56-52

Byrd. Discovery: The story of the second Byrd . . . New York, 1935. 67-56-53

Cherry-Garrard. The Worst Journey in the World. New York, [1923]. 2 vols. 67-56-54

Darlington. My Antarctic Honeymoon. London, [1957]. 67-56-55

Dufek. Operation Deepfreeze. New York, [1957]. 67-56-56

Ellsworth. Beyond Horizons . . . London, [1938]. 67-56-57

Fisher. Shackleton and the Antarctic . . . Boston, 1958. 67-56-58

Fuchs. The Crossing of Antarctica, The Commonwealth . . . Boston, [1958]. 67-56-59

Giaever. The White Desert, The Official Account . . . New York, 1955. 67-56-60

Gould. Cold: The Record of an Antarctic Sledge . . . New York, 1931. 67-56-61

Gould. The Polar Regions and their Relation to Human . . . New York, 1958. 67-56-62

Kemp. The Conquest of the Antarctic. London, [1956]. 67-56-63

Levick. Antarctic Penguins, A Study of Their Social . . . London, [1915]. 67-56-64

Lowe. From Everest to the South Pole. New York, [1961]. 67-56-65

Marret. Seven Men among the Penguins. New York, 1955. 67-56-66

Migot. The Lonely South, Translated from the French. London, [1956]. 67-56-67

Mill. The Life of Sir Ernest Shackleton. London, [1933]. 67-56-68

Ommanney. South Latitude. London, [1938]. 67-56-69

Ponting. The Great White South or With Scott . . . London, [1928]. 67-56-70

Scholes. Fourteen Men, The Story of the Australian . . . London, [1951]. 67-56-71

Seaver. Edward Wilson: Nature Lover. New York, [1938]. 67-56-72

Seaver. Scott -of the Antarctic: A Study in Character. London, [1953]. 67-56-73

Smith. By the Seat of My Pants. Boston, [1961]. 67-56-74

Swan. The Historic Huts of the Antarctic. (Reprint from Appalachia, 1961) 67-56-75

Cherry-Garrard. The Worst Journey in the World. Middlesex, [1938]. 2 vols.67-56-76

Cherry-Garrard. The Worst Journey in the World.- Middlesex, [1948]. 67-56-77

Scott. Scott's Last Expedition.In Two Volumes. London, 1914. 67-56-78

Scientific American, Sept. 1962. Vol. 207, no. 3 (special issue). 67-56-80

Anderson. Expedition South. London, [1957]. 67-56-81

Clift. Our World in Antarctica. Boston, [1962]. 67-56-82

Law. Anare: Australia's Antarctic Outposts. Melbouume, 1957. 67-56-83

Schulthess. Antarctica [a photographic survey]. New York, 1960. Oblong portfolio. 67-56-84

Cherry-Garrard. The Worst Journey in the World. New York: 1923. 63 p. Private printing. 67-56-85

[Swan] In perspective: Real Cold. [Providence, R.I., 1962]. Newspaper clipping. 67-56-86*

Wright to Swan, March 6th [19621 ALS with envelope, Victoria, B.C. 67-56-87*

Wright to Editor of Providence Journal, Feb. 21 [1962], Victoria, B. C. with envelope. 67-56-88*

The National Geographic Magazine. January, 1959. 67-56-89

The National Geographic Magazine. October, 1959. 67-56-90

The National Geographic Magazine. February, 1963. Vol. 123, No. 2. 67-56-91

The National Geographic Magazine. April, 1958. Vol. 113, No. 4. 67-56-92

The National Geographic Magazine. January, 1955. Vol. 107, No. 1. 67-56-93

The National Geographic Magazine. October, 1932. Vol., 62, No. 4. 67-56-94

The National Geographic Magazine. August, 1930. Vol. 58, No. 2. 67-56-95

Cherry-Garrard. The Worst Journey in the World. London, 1965. 67-56-96


1967 - PURCHASE

Morrell. A Narrative of four voyages. NY, 1832. 67-60

South Polar Times. Prospectus. London, 1904. 67-86*

Nordenskjold. Viaje al polo sur. Barcelona, 1904. 2 vol. 67-352

Drygalski. Zum kontinent des eisigen sudens. Berlin, 1904. 67-429


1968 - PURCHASE

Scott. Scott's Last Expedition. London, 1913. 2 vols. 68-50

Turley. The Voyages of Captain Scott. New York, 1919. 68-166

Ponting. The Great White South. New York, 1923. 68-167

Commonwealth of Australia. Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition. 1949-50. Operation . . . Melbourne, 1949. 68-188

Commonwealth of Australia. Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition, 1947. Operation . . . Melbourne, 1947. 68-189

Mill. The Siege of the South Pole. London, 1905. 68-216

Charcot. Journal de l'Expedition Antarctique Française, Paris, [1906]. 68-217

Charcot. Le "Pourquoi Pas?" dans l'Antarctique. Paris, [1910]. 68-218

Wild. Shackleton's Last Voyage. New York, [1923]. 68-395

Wegener. Der Südpol. Berlin, 1897. 68-538


1968 - GIFTS

Cook. Through the First Antarctic Night. New York, 1909. (Gift of William Lowell Putnam). 68-147

Mawson. The Home of the Blizzard. Philadelphia, [1914]. 2 vols. (Gift of William Lowell Putnam). 68-148

Walton. Two Years in the Antarctic. London, [1955]. (Gift of William Lowell Putnam). 68-149

Shackleton. The Heart of the Antarctic. Philadelphia, 1909. 2 vols. (Gift of Mr. & Mrs. Stuart Sherman). 68-150

Gerlache de Gomery. Voyage de la "Belgica" Quinze . . . Paris, 1902. (Gfft of Bradford Swan). 68-373


1969 - PURCHASE

Nordenskjold. Die Polarwelt und ihre Nachbarlander. Leipzig & Berlin, 1909. 69-119

Nordenskjold. Nord-Und Sudpolarander. Leipzig & Wein, 1926. 69-120

Nordenskjold. "Antarctic" Zwei Jahre in Schnee . . . Berlin, 1904. 2 vols. 69-121

Filchner. Zum Sechsten Erdteil Die Zweite Deutsche . . . Berlin, [1922]. 69-122

Byrd. Solo. [Milan,] 1948. 69-236

Shackleton. Alla conquista del Polo Sud. Milan, 1909. 2 vols. 69-238

Scott. L'Ultima Spedizione. Milan, 1914. 2 vols. 69-587


SWAN GIFT - 1970

Turley. The Voyages of Captain Scott. London, 1914. 70-410

American Geographical Society. Problems of Polar . . . New York, 1928. 70-411

Gwynn. Captain Scott. London, [1929]. 70-412

Joerg. Brief History of Polar . . . New York, 1930. 70-413

Hayward. The Last Continent of Adventure. New York, 1930. 70-414

Taylor. Antarctic Adventure. New York, 1930. 70-415

Kearton. The Island of Penguins. London, 1930. 70-416

Oulié. Charcot of the Antarctic. London, [1938]. 70-417

Marshall. With Scott to the Pole. London, [1941]. 70-418

Owen. The Antarctic Ocean. New York, [1941]. 70-419

James. Scott of the Antarctic. London, 1948. 70-420

Lindsay. The Epic of Captain Scott. London, [1948]. 70-421

Sorensen. Wildlife in the Subantarctic. Christchurch, N.Z., 1951. 70-422

Mountevans. Happy Adventurer. New York, 1951. 70-423

Mountevans. Man Against the Desolate . . . New York, 1951. 70-424

Mountevans. The Antarctic. New York, 1956. 70-425

Henry. The White Continent. New York, [1951]. 70-426

Scholes. Seventh Continent. London, [1954]. 70-427

Sullivan. Quest for a Continent. New York, [1957]. 70-428

Sullivan. Assault on the Unknown. New York, [1961]. 70-429

Barber. The White Desert. London, [1958]. 70-430

Bowman. From Scott to Fuchs. London, [1958]. 70-431

Liversidge. The Last Continent. [London, 1958]. 70-432

Siple. 90° South; The Story of the American . . . New York, [1959]. 70-433

Fuchs. Antarctic Adventure. New York, [1959]. 70-434

Grierson. Sir Hubert Wilkins. London, [1960]. 70-435

Debenham. Antarctica. New York, 1961. 70-436

Ronne. Antarctic Command. Indianapolis, [1961]. 70-437

Hillary. No Latitude for Error. New York, 1961. 70-438

Trese. Penguins have Square Eyes. New York, [1962]. 70-439

Caras. Antarctica. Philadelphia, [1962]. 70-440

Operation Deep Freeze 61. [South Boston, MA, 1962?]. 70-441

Billing. South: Man and Nature in . . . Wellington, 1964]. 70-442

Clarke. On the Ice. New York, [1966]. 70-443


1972 - GIFT

Greely. Three Years of Arctic Service. New York, 1886. 2 vols. ("Discard" from R.I. State Library). 72-57


1973 - PURCHASE

Byrd. Min Sydpolsfaerd Paa Dansk . . . Copenhagen,1931. (Metcalf $6.00). 73-29


1975 - GIFT

Wilson. Birds of the Antarctic. New York, [1968]. (Gift of Bradford Swan). 75-288


1977 - SWAN ESTATE

Chapman. Watkin's Last Expedition. Middlesex, [1938]. 77-20

Neider. Antarctica Authentic Accounts. New York, [1972]. 77-21

Pound. Scott of the Antarctic. London, [1966]. 77-22

Nordenskjold. Antarctica or Two Years . . . New York, 1905. 77-23

Cherry-Garrard. The Worst Journey in the World. New York, 1930. 2 copies. 77-24

U.S. Library of Congress. Antarctic Bibliography. Washington, DC, 1970. 77-25

Peary. The North Pole. London, 1910. 77-26

Cherry-Garrard. The Worst Journey in the World. London, 1937. 77-27

Cherry-Garrard. Postscript to the Worst Journey . . . London,1951. 77-28

Scott. Scott's Last Expedition. London, 1913. 2 vols. 77-29

Wilson. Diary of the Terra Nova. London, [1972]. 77-30

Wilson. Diary of the Discovery Expedition. London [1966]. 77-31

Quartermain. South to the Pole. London, 1967. 77-32

Hayes. The Conquest of the South Pole. London, [1936]. 77-33

Weems. Peary the Explorer and the Man. Boston, 1967. 77-34

Neider. The Edge of the World. Ross Island. Garden City, NY, 1974. 77-35

Dyson. The World of Ice. New York, 1962. 77-36

Dovers. My Friends the Huskies. New York, [1957]. 77-40

Daugherty. City Under the Ice. New York, [1963]. 77-42

Stefansson. Discovery. New York, [1964]. 77-43

Wright. The Big Nail. New York, [1970]. 77-44

Marshall. With Scott to the Pole. London, [1949]. 77-45

Vesper. Die Post in der Antarktis. Dusseldorf, [1959]. 77-47

Mountevans. British Polar Explorers Admiral Sir Edward Evans . . . London, 1946. 77-48

Seaver. The Faith of Edward Wilson. London, [1948]. 77-49

Kemp. The Conquest of the Antarctic. New York, [1957]. 77-50

[Silverberg.] Antarctic Conquest. Indianapolis, [1965]. 77-51

Kingsley. Ravenshoe. London, [ca. 1900]. 77-52

Bertram. Arctic and Antarctic. Cambridge, [1939]. 77-53

Billing. Forbush and the Penguins. Wellington, Australia, [1965]. 77-55

Herbert. A World of Men. New York, [1969]. 77-56

Mountevans. Arctic Solitudes. New York, [1953]. 77-57

Briggs. Laboratory at the Bottom of the World. New York, [1970]. 77-58

Mountfield. A History of Polar Exploration. New York, 1974. 77-59

The Polar Times. Rego Park, NY. 31 issues. 77-60

Antarctic Journal of the United States. Washington, DC, [1966]. 77-61

U.S. National Science Foundation. Office of Antarctic Programs. Antarctic Report. Nov. 1964. Washington, DC, 1964. 77-62

Bio Science. April, 1965, Vol. 15, No. 5. Washington, DC, 1965. 77-63

U.S. Navy. Naval Support Force, Antarctica. Support for Science. Washington, DC, 1965. 77-64

U.S. Antarctic Projects Officer. Support for Science. Washington, DC, [1964].77-65

Quartermain. Historic Huts. Wellington, NZ, 1960. 77-66

U.S. Antarctic Projects Officer, Bulletin. Washington, DC, [1959-1965]. 77-67

Scott. Letter to officers. [Antarctica, 1903]. MS 77-68*

Cook. [To George W. Rowell.] Maine, 1909. MS 77-69*

Amundsen. Mr. Perris of publishing house . . . Norway, 1912. MS 77-70*

Scott. Woolseley Tool & Motor Car . . . London, 1910. MS 77-71*

Frederick Albert Cook. [Signature]. 1909. MS 77-72*

[Autograph signatures of Polar explorers] MS 77-73*

National Antarctic Expedition. Farewell Dinner. [New Zealand, 1904]. 77-74*

The Geographical Journal. Vol. CXXVIIII. Part 2. London, 1962. 77-82

The Geographical Journal. Vol. CXXV. Parts 3-4. London, 1959. 77-83

Polar Notes. Occasional publication of the Stefansson Collection. Hanover, NH, 1961. 77-88

Popular Mechanics. Vol. 115, No. 4, April, 1961. Chicago, IL, 1961. 77-91

The National Geographic Magazine. Vol. CXVI, No. 4. Washington, DC, 1959. 77-92

The National Geographic Magazine. Vol. CXII, No. 1. Washington, DC, 1957. 77-93

The National Geographic Magazine. Vol. XCII, No. 4. Washington, DC, 1947. 77-94


1984 - PURCHASE

Welcome Home Dinner. [Menu from Princes Restaurant]. London, 1909. (Harper, $203). 84-29

National Antarctic Expedition, 1901-1904. [Album of Photographs and Sketches with Portfolio of Panoramic Views] London: Royal Society, 1908. (Miller, $750.00). 84-127

Frank Debenham. Report on the Maps and Surveys. London, 1923. (Associates, $150.00). 84-128


MISCELLANEOUS

6 roll maps.

Atlas Antarctiki. Leningrad, 1966-69. 2 vols.

V. von Haardt. Sud-Polar-Karte.

2 archival boxes containing National Science Foundation and U. S. Naval Support Force, Antarctica news releases on various topics; Operation Deepfreeze.

2 archival boxes of U.S. Navy official Antarctic photographs. Antarctica souvenir photo book belonging to Bradford Swan.

1 archival box "Misc. Uncat."

14 uncatalogued misc. folders and envelopes






The John Carter Brown Library hosted in 1967 "THE EXPLORATION OF ANTARCTICA, an exhibition of books and maps based on the Swan Collection given to the John Carter Brown Library in memory of Lila L. Swan by Bradford F. Swan." The catalogue of that exhibition appears here [note that many of the items, particularly those of an earlier date, are from the collection of the Library and not from the Swan Collection]:
"The John Carter Brown Library is an independently funded and administered center for advanced research in history and the humanities, at Brown University." It "...contains one of the outstanding collections in the world on the history of the Americas, both North and South, published prior to about 1825. Among the some 50,000 volumes are numerous books and pamphlets describing the growth of the European colonies in the New World and the impact of discovery and exploration of the New World upon Europe."


THE SOUTHERN CONTINENT

1. CLAUDIUS PTOLEMAEUS. Geographia. Manuscript atlas. c. 1450.
The last map of the Brown-Wilczekianus Codex is a map of the southern half of Africa. Whereas most Ptolemaic maps of the pre-Columbian period show the Indian Ocean as a lake with Africa joined to India in one land mass, this exceptional map indicates the possibility of sea to the south of Africa.

2. HENRICUS GLAREANUS. De Gaeometriae principiis ad sphaerae astronomica noticiam necessaris - Manuscript, before 1520.
The polar projection maps drawn by the Swiss geographer Glareanus are exceptionally early maps of this type and represent an unusual and creative geographical idea for his time. In the absence of further information the south polar area has been left blank on this map.

3. BAPTISTA AGNESE. [An atlas of Portolan charts.] Manuscript [c. 1543- 45].
This manuscript atlas shows the track of Magellan's voyage around the world. The passage around South America was made through a narrow body of water and only land could be seen to the south. This gave rise to the belief that the Strait of Magellan was the only gap between two large land masses.

4. ROBERT RECORDE. The Castle of Knowledge. London, 1556.
The book represents the best early thinking about the Antarctic. Although nothing was known of the area, the assumption was made that the Arctic region had to be balanced by an opposite or Ant-arctic region.

"The Antartike circle is equall and equidistant to the Arctike circle, and toucheth the Horizonte in one only point, and is all vnder grounde, and all the starres that be in it, are euer more out of our sighte."
5. ANTONIO FLORIAN. [World in gores, northern and southern hemispheres. Venice, 1556.]
Florianus shows here the Southern Continent south of the Strait of Magellan without any descriptive legends, indicating some uncertainty in his mind concerning the inaccessible land to the south.

6. [GERHARD MERCATOR.] Orbis imaginem. Rome, Antonio Salamanca, [c. 1560.]
Early in his distinguished career Gerhard Mercator published his map of the world on a double cordiform projection, showing the Southern Continent with a conservative note as to the uncertainty of its extent. Shown here is a copy by Antonio Salamanca, published about 1560.

7. GIACOMO GASTALDI. Cosmographia. Vniversalis. Venice, 1569.
The imaginary Southern Continent of the sixteenth-century cosmographers appears on many Italian maps of the period. The oval projection of this map shows the concept clearly and impressively.

8. PETER MARTYR. De Orbe Novo. Paris, 1587. The first map which shows the impact of Drake's voyage on geographical knowledge is the one by an unknown cartographer (using, apparently, a Spanish model) contained in this edition of the famous Decades prepared by Richard Hakluyt. Note the reference to Nova Albion (i.e. California) and the first indication of what we now call Drake Passage between Tierra del Fuego and Antarctica.

9. The famous voyage of Sir Francis Drake into the South Sea, and there henceabout the whole Globe of the Earth.
Drake sailed south of Tierra del Fuego in making his circumnavigation. By doing this he established that a large body of water lay to the south of the American continent. This water, now called the Drake Passage, was first described in print in Drake's account of his circumnavigation, first inserted in most copies of Hakluyt's Principall Navigations, in 1589.

10. ORONCE FINE. Cosmographia. Vniversalis. [Venice, c. 1590.]
This single cordiform projection is one of a number of maps based on a woodcut by the French geographer and mathematician Oronce Fine. The Southern Continent is here said to have been recently discovered but "not yet fully examined."

11. [BISHOP JOSEPH HALL]. Mundus Alter Et Idem. [Frankfort, 1605.] The Discovery of A New World. [London, 1609.]
Bishop Hall's satire on European manners was placed in the Antarctic. Here, in the vein of Utopia and Gulliver's Travels, one finds "Drink-allia" and "Eat-allia" and "Gossipia" where the women live. New lands were discovered so regularly in the 16th century that an inhabited southern continent would have been no surprise.

"... and finde this: Terra Australis, nondum Cognita. The unknowne Southerne Continent. What good spirit but would greeue at this? If they know it for a Continent, and for a Southerne Continent, why then doe they call it unknowne?"
12. PEDRO FERNANDEZ DE QUIROS. Terra Australis incognita. London, 1617.
Fernandez de Quiros was the first person to search for the Southern Continent. He sailed to the New Hebrides on one voyage but when he tried to obtain funds for another voyage he was refused. Of his fifty petitions for money only this one was printed and translated into English. It helped perpetuate the myth of the Southern Continent.

13. [HENRY NEVILLE]. The Isle of Pines, Or A late Discovery of a fourth Island. London, 1668.
Neville was a political writer and he, like Hall before him, used the mythical continent as the setting for his tale.

14. Relation D'Un Voyage Du Pole Arctique Au Pole Antarctique. Paris, 1723.
First published in Amsterdam in 1721, this book is pure science fiction. The author purports to have tipped his boat at the North Pole and sailed through the center of the earth to the South Pole.

15. PHILIPPE BUACHE, Carte des Terres Australes... Paris, 1739 [revised 1754].
Published under the auspices of the French Académie des Sciences, this map by the famous geographer Philippe Buache shows the routes of various expeditions into the Southern Hemisphere beginning with Magellan and including that of Bouvet de Lozier in 1738. A later hand has added (in black ink) the route of Cook's southern voyage. The map is of interest as a summary of mid- eighteenth-century knowledge as well as an indication of the questions which scientists were asking at the time about the Southern Continent and of theories which were taking shape in their minds.


EARLY EXPLORATION

16. JAMES COOK. A Second Voyage Round The World In the Years MDCCLXXII, LXXIII, LXXIV, LXXV. London, 1776.
Alexander Dalrymple was sure that there was a habitable southern continent. He had hoped to turn the British Transit of Venus expedition of 1769 to Tahiti into a chance to prove his thesis. Unsuccessful in this, he badgered the Admiralty until they sent Cook out in the "Resolution" to silence him. Cook sailed around the Antarctic, crossing the Antarctic circle several times, and ended the myth of the Southern Continent.

"December 19. . . . At 6, P.M. Crossed The Antarctic Circle. Sun the whole day."
17. JAMES COOK. A Voyage Towards The South Pole. 4th edition. London, 1784.
Cook established the limits within which any southern continent must lie. He guessed from the nature of the ice floes that they came from land, but thought that the land would be too cold for human life. As a scientist and as an explorer he was superb. The Swan Collection is testimony that he was not much of a prophet.
"It is true, however, that the greatest part of this Southern Continent (supposing there is one), must lie within the polar circle, where the sea is so pestered with ice, that the land is thereby inaccessible. The risque one runs in exploring a coast, in these unknown and icy seas, is so very great, that I can be bold enough to say than [sic] no man will ever venture farther than I have done; and that the lands which may lie to the South will never be explored. . . ."
18. AARON ARROWSMITH. Map of the World on a Globular Projection. . . London, 1794 [revised 1799].
The magnificent hemispheres shown on this and the adjoining panel show in detail the routes of the three voyages of Captain Cook. The ice fields and mountains sighted on his second voyage, in which he twice crossed the Antarctic Circle, are carefully noted, but there is no indication whatever of the existence of land in the areas not traversed. Geographic speculation has finally given way to the recording of actual knowledge.


FIRST EXPLORING PARTIES

19. JAMES WEDDELL. A Voyage Towards The South Pole. London, 1825.
Weddell, an English whaler, sailed towards the Antarctic in 1822 and was able to sail 214 nautical miles farther south than Cook had gone, without seeing ice. He made a number of observations in the sea he discovered which is named for him.

20. BENJAMIN MORRELL. A Narrative of Four Voyages to the South Sea. New York, 1832.
Morrell was an American sealing captain who claimed to be the first American to penetrate the Antarctic Circle. Although Nathaniel Palmer, a whaling captain, seems to have been the first, Morrell's interest led him to stimulate Congress into sending an American scientific expedition to the Antarctic and the South Seas.

21. JULES S.C. DUMONT D'URVILLE. Voyage Au Pole Sud. Paris, 1841.
From 1837 to 1840 a French scientific expedition sailed to the Antarctic and the South Seas under the experienced and talented Dumont D'Urville. The scientific publications of his previous expeditions had already set a standard of quality which Americans and British sought to emulate in their own work.

22. CHARLES WILKES. Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition. Philadelphia, 1844.
The Exploring Expedition sent out by the United States from 1838 to 1842 was hampered by inexperience and poor equipment. Nevertheless Wilkes charted nearly 1500 miles of the Antarctic coast. The few copies of the twenty or so volumes of the reports of this expedition which were printed were distributed to the various states. This library now holds these volumes on deposit from the State of Rhode Island.

23. SIR JAMES CLARK ROSS. A Voyage of Discovery and Research In The Southern and Antarctic Regions. London, 1847.
As the French and Americans had found no approach to the continent the sectors which they had explored, Ross explored another area. The map displayed here attests the importance of international cooperation in these explorations.

24. SIR JAMES CLARK ROSS. A Voyage of Discovery and Research in the Southern and Antarctic Regions. London, 1847.
The expedition equipped by the British government and under the command of Ross was, in contrast to the French and American expeditions, intended solely for Antarctic exploration. In two ships, "Erebus" and "Terror," Ross passed through the ice pack to discover the Ross Sea and the mountainous land beyond.

25. VINCENZ von HAARDT. Süd-Polar-Karte von V. v. Haardt. Bremen, 1895.
Published on the occasion of the 11th Deutschen Geographentag in Bremen, this elephantine map, scaled 1:10, 000, 000, portrays all of the little which was known of the Antarctic area. Most of the voyages charted on this map had been made long before 1850; however the later ones, including the expeditions of Larsen and Evenson of 1893, are also included.

THE 1890s

26. WILLIM GORDON BURN-MURDOCK. From Edinburgh To The Antarctic. London, 1894.
Although a number of ships had sailed for the Antarctic after Ross's expedition, it was not until the 1890's that interest was again great enough in the area to organize specific Antarctic expeditions. Like most of the expeditions of the decade, this Scottish one stayed aboard ship and explored the approaches to the continent.
--From the Swan Collection.

27. [ROBERT N. R. BROWN and others]. The Voyage of the "Scotia." Edinburgh, 1906.
The Scots have a separate and special Antarctic tradition which is not very well known and seldom mentioned. Although they did nothing spectacular, they sent several important expeditions south. This is an account of the "Scotia" which under Dr. W. S. Bruce explored unknown areas of the Weddell Sea.
--From the Swan Collection.

28. FREDERICK A. COOK. Through The First Antarctic Night, 1898-1899, A Narrative of the Voyage of the "Belgica". New York, 1909.
The Belgian expedition of 1898-1899 had an international crew. When its ship, the "Belgica, " was trapped in the ice, the expedition was forced to spend a winter on the boat. Dr. Cook played an important role in keeping the crew in health and good spirits. This winter spent in the Antarctic showed that it could be done.
--Gift to the Swan Collection of Mr. William L. Putnam.

29. LOUIS BERNACCHI. To The South Polar Regions: Expedition of 1898-1900. London, 1901.
Louis Bernacchi was an active explorer and a prolific writer. He participated in several expeditions and wrote about a number of others, helping greatly in making Antarctic exploration popular.
--From the Swan Collection.

30. CARSTEN BORCHGREVINK. First On The Antarctic Continent. London, 1901.
Borchgrevink, a Norwegian, led a British expedition to the Antarctic from 1898 to 1900. He showed that one could spend a winter in the Antarctic in relative comfort and safety. After Borchgrevink there were a number of Antarctic expeditions organized.
--From the Swan Collection.

"DISCOVERY" AND ITS PARTNERS

31. ERICH von DRYGALSKI. Zum Kontinent des eisigen Südens. Berlin, 1904.
In the autumn of 1901 three well-equipped expeditions left Europe for the Antarctic. The German government sent the "Gauss" under Drygalski, a scientist, which concentrated on meteorological and magnetic observations. This book is his account of the German expedition.

32. OTTO NORDENSKJÖLD. Viaje Al Polo Sur. Barcelona, 1904.
Although the Spaniard Fernandez de Quiros was the first to search for the Southern Continent, by the twentieth century the Spanish seem to have lost most of their interest in the Antarctic and, judging from the binding of this translation [flamboyant silver-tooled red cloth], we suspect that they do not have much rapport with the spirit of Antarctic exploration.

33. OTTO NORDENSKJÖLD. Antarctica or Two Years Amongst the Ice of the South Pole. London, 1905.
A Swedish expedition, organized privately, entered the Weddell Sea and stayed two winters. When its ship was crushed by ice the men were rescued by the Argentine gunboat "Uruguay."
--From the Swan Collection.

34. ROBERT FALCON SCOTT. The Voyage of the "Discovery." London, 1905.
Whereas the German and Swedish expeditions were headed by scientists, the British were led by Commander Scott of the Royal Navy. This expedition was the first to conduct extensive inland exploration. Besides numerous scientific observations, several small journeys and one by Scott of 380 miles were made to explore the interior.
--From the Swan Collection.

35. ROBERT FALCON SCOTT. Map from The Voyage of the "Discovery." London, 1905.
How little was known of the Antarctic in 1905 is suggested by this map of Scott's. The exploratory probes made by this first large expedition to establish itself on the Ross Ice Shelf are here charted. The "Discovery" explored the coast while land parties sought the limits of the ice shelf and went into the mountains behind it.
--From the Swan Collection.

36. ALBERT B. ARMITAGE. Two Years In The Antarctic. London, 1905.
This is a popular narrative of the "Discovery" expedition. Scott's official account, admirably and correctly detached and very detailed, lacked the drama and the warmth supplied by this more personal version.
--From the Swan Collection.

37. South Polar Times. [1902 - 1905].
To keep up morale during the long and very cold Antarctic winters, the "Discovery" crew prepared a newspaper of poems and stories, drawings, cartoons, and some beautiful water colors by Dr. Wilson. These typewritten sheets, with their illustrations, were carried to England and reproduced in a limited edition for a wider circulation.
--From the Swan Collection.

SHACKLETON AND SCOTT

38. ERNEST SHACKLETON. The Heart Of The Antarctic. London, 1909.
Shackleton, who had become very ill on the "Discovery" expedition and had had to be sent home, surprised everyone, including Scott, by organizing an expedition himself. He found a way to cross the mountain barrier by following a huge glacier--now the Beardmore Glacier--to the Polar Plateau.
--From the Swan Collection.

39. ERNEST SHACKLETON. The Heart Of The Antarctic. New York, 1909.
Shackleton's party turned back from their attempt on the Pole only 97 nautical miles away. "Our food lies ahead and death stalks us behind" wrote Shackleton who, despite many escapes from disaster, returned to the McMurdo Sound base. This book is opened to the description of the last day of the outward trip.

"January 9. -- Our last day outwards. We have shot our bolt, and the tale is latitude 88° 23' South, longitude 162° East. ... At 9 A.M. we were in 88° 23' South, half running and half walking over a surface much hardened by the recent blizzard. It was strange for us to go along without the nightmare of a sledge dragging behind us. Homeward bound at last. Whatever regrets may be, we have done our best."
--Gift to the Swan Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Stuart C. Sherman.

40. AURORA AUSTRALIS. Antarctica, 1907 - 1908.
Shackleton took a printing press with him on his ship the "Nimrod. On this press the party printed a newspaper of a hundred copies which were later bound in wood from the packing crates; our copy is from a case of Stewed Kidneys. . . This first book printed on the Antarctic continent joins this library's copies of the first books printed on the continents of North and South America.
--Purchased in part with the gift of Bradford F. Swan.

41. SOUTH POLAR TIMES. [1910 - 1912].
The popular paper of the "Discovery" expedition was revived by the members of the "Terra Nova" expedition of 1910 - 1912. Its editor was young, gay Apsley Cherry-Garrard. Printed later in England and bound uniformly with the earlier Times, it too was distributed in limited numbers. We open the book to a song commemorating the photographer Herbert Ponting.

Chorus.
Then Pont, Ponco, pont, and long may Ponco pont,
With his finger on the trigger of his gadget,
For whenever he's around we're sure to hear the sound
Of his high speed cinematographic ratchet.
--From the Swan Collection.

42. HERBERT G. PONTING. The Great White South Or With Scott In The Antarctic. London, [1928].
Ponting, whose activeness is suggested in the song preceding, took a remarkable series of photographs in the Antarctic. The numerous photographs, the paintings of Wilson, and the great number of books about Scott's last expedition make this the best and most beautifully described polar exploration.
--From the Swan Collection.

43. THOMAS GRIFFITH TAYLOR. With Scott: The Silver Lining. London, 1916.
We open the book to Taylor's description of Cherry-Garrard's revival of the South Polar Times. Taylor was a member of the large scientific detachment with the "Terra Nova." The drama of the Scott polar party can easily make one forget that a great deal of work had been done by members of the expedition before the loss of their leader.

"Cherry-Garrard now began his most arduous winter employment as Editor of the South Polar Times. He had brought down a typewriter, and proposed to continue the Antarctic publication, . . . A tin receptacle was nailed under the notice board, and labelled the Editor's Box, and Cherry set to work on his editorial pending the avalanche of contributions. . . ."

44. ERNEST SHACKLETON. Maps and a view from The Heart Of The Antarctic. London, 1909.
The central map of the three is the "general map showing the explorations and surveys of the expedition 1907-'09." The flanking maps show in more detail the path of the party which went to the South Magnetic Pole, and the path of Shackleton's party from where it passed Scott's furthest point south to its halt on the Polar Plateau. The panoramas depict the mountainous landscape which the men of the two parties were the first humans to see.
--From the Swan Collection.

SOUTH POLAR TRAGEDY

45. ROBERT FALCON SCOTT. Scott's Last Expedition. London, 1914.
The notebook written by Scott and the last letters of Scott, Wilson, and Bowers were found with the bodies of the three companions in their tent. We open the book to Scott's last message.

We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker,
of course, and the end cannot be far.
It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more -- R. Scott
Last Entry --
For Gods sake look after our people
--From the Swan Collection.

46. APSLEY CHERRY- GARRARD. The Worst Journey In The World. London, [1922].
No better description of the finding of Scott and his companions exists than the passage by Cherry-Garrard. We have opened two later editions of The Worst Journey to the pages which contain that passage.

Then Atkinson read the lesson from the Burial Service from Corinthians. Perhaps it has never been read in a more magnificent cathedral and under more impressive circumstances -- for it is a grave which kings must envy. Then some prayers from the Burial Service: and there with the floor-cloth under them and the tent above we buried them in their sleeping-bags -- and surely their work has not been in vain.
--From the Swan Collection.

47. SIR DOUGLAS MAWSON. The Home Of The Blizzard. London, 1914.
Mawson played an important part in the scientific work of the Shackleton expedition of 1907 - 1909. From 1911 to 1914 he led an Australian expedition which explored the coast of Wilkes Land. We see how a fellow explorer, who had just lost several men himself, reacted to the news of Scott's death in the passage at which the book is opened.

The first news received from the outside world was the bare statement that Captain Scott and four of his companions had perished on their journey to the South Pole. It was some time before we knew the tragic details which came home, direct and poignant, to us in Adelie Land.
--Gift to the Swan Collection of Mr. William L. Putnam.

48. ROALD AMUNDSEN. The South Pole. New York, 1913.
Amundsen, whose intention of being first at the North Pole was thwarted by Peary, had turned his ship south and, using dog teams, arrived at the South Pole a month ahead of Scott. We open the book to Amundsen's account of an anticlimactic finish to a dull trip to the Pole.

At three in the afternoon a simultaneous "Halt!" rang out from the drivers. . . . The goal was reached, the journey ended. I cannot say -- though I know it would sound much more effective -- that the object of my life was attained. That would be romancing rather too barefacedly. I had better be honest and admit straight out that I have never known any man to be placed in such a diametrically opposite position to the goal of his desires as I was at that moment. The regions around the North Pole -- well, yes, the North Pole itself -- had attracted me from childhood, and here I was at the South Pole. Can anything more topsy-turvy be imagined?
--From the Swan Collection.


CHERRY -GARRARD

49. APSLEY CHERRY-GARRARD. The Worst Journey In The World. London, 1922.
Cherry-Garrard's own copy of the first edition of his very personal account of his part in the Scott expedition of 1910-1912. The "journey" referred to in the title was made at the depth of the Antarctic winter to obtain eggs of the Emperor penguin. With Dr. E. A. Wilson and Lt. Bowers he sledged in semi-darkness for 140 miles to return with three eggs.
--From the Swan Collection.

50. APSLEY CHERRY-GARRARD. The Worst Journey In The World. New York, 1923.
This is the second edition with a revised preface. The Worst Journey contains a number of illustrations by Dr. Edward Wilson, a companion of Cherry-Garrard. Both companions of this journey, Wilson and Bowers, later accompanied Scott to the Pole; their bodies were found with his in the tent.
--From the Swan Collection.

51. APSLEY CHERRY-GARRARD. The Worst Journey.In The World. New York, 1930.
This is Cherry- Garrard's copy of his book which he used to prepare the Penguin paperback edition shown at the right. The publication of his story in a two-volume and later a one-volume paperback edition, both of which come to us in the Swan Collection, testify to the popularity with which it was received.
--From the Swan Collection.

52. Records of the Canterbury Museum, 1911.
This report on the fishes of the Antarctic waters was obtained by Cherry-Garrard during the expedition and he had it with him on the "Terra Nova," as his signature attests.
--From the Swan Collection.

53. GERALD S. DOORLY. The Voyages of the "Morning." London, 1916.
The "Morning" was the relief ship sent when the "Discovery" seemed icetrapped in 1905. Cherry-Garrard's copy of this book reveals what he thought of Commander Edward Evans. Evans had assumed command on Scottt's failure to return, and although he has been treated gently in accounts of the "Terra Nova" expedition, previously unknown papers of Scott revealed in a recently-published biography of him indicate that he shared Cherry-Garrard's doubts about Evans's abilities.
--From the Swan Collection.

54. THE POLAR BOOK. London, 1930.
This booklet was prepared for the British Polar Exhibition of 1930. Cherry-Garrard contributed to this publication but was obviously unhappy with Dr. Murray-Levick's "Notes on the Rationing of Sledging Parties." Vitamins were quite unknown to the "Terra Nova" expedition and the progressive weakness of Scott's polar party may have had much of its origin in the nutritional value of their rations.
--From the Swan Collection.

55. "Worcester" Old Boys Association Complimentary Dinner to Rear-Admiral E.R.G.R. Evans. . .
On the back of this menu of the dinner given for Evans of the Scott expedition on March 27th, 1929, Evans made and signed this drawing [of a penguin]. A naval hero in the first world war, Evans became Lord Mountevans, a substantial figure in the English Navy.
--From the Swan Collection.

56. VILHJALMUR STEFANSSON. The Friendly Arctic. London, 1921.
This is Cherry-Garrard's copy which he apparently obtained in 1922. In light of the fact that his own book was written at about the time of his correspondence with Stefansson (at right), this is a most interesting association copy.
--From the Swan Collection.

57. APSLEY CHERRY-GARRARD. Autograph draft of an unsent letter to Vilhjalmur Stefansson.
Written on the reverse side of a letter to Cherry-Garrard from Stefansson and dated August 1st 1923, this very candid reaction was greatly subdued in the version mailed, which is now in the Stefansson Collection at Dartmouth College.

The title is frankly an immodest one. I wanted to call it "To Hell: With Scott," but refrained. And when I thought of "Never Again: Scott, some penguins and the Pole" it was objected that it was too much like saying "Christ, some coppers and the Cross."
--From the Swan Collection.

58. APSLEY CHERRY-GARRARD. Autograph draft of a letter to Vilhjalmur Stefansson.
His first draft written and rejected, Cherry-Garrard again tried to answer Stefansson. The sarcasm in this version is more carefully disguised than in the first. This is essentially the text of the letter actually sent.

As to the title The Worst Journey in the World may well lie between Picadilly and Harley Street. The Best Journey in the World would have done just as well.
--From the Swan Collection.


THE LAST PIONEERS

59. SIR ERNEST SHACKLETON. South. New York, 1926.
Shackleton decided to return to the Antarctic in 1914 - 1917. This time he was going to try to cross the continent. Sending a party to the Ross Sea to lay out provisions where he expected to end the trip, he entered the Weddell Sea where his ship was trapped in the ice and crushed.
--From the Swan Collection.

60. ERNEST JOYCE. The South Polar Trail. London, 1929.
Joyce was a member of the Ross Sea party which Shackleton had expected to join. When the main party failed to appear, being adrift on an ice floe, the members of the sea party were left to fend for themselves and were forced to usefood which the Scott expedition had left in 1912.
--From the Swan Collection.

61. RICHARD EVELYN BYRD. Discovery: The Story of the Second Byrd Expedition. New York, 1935.
Admiral Byrd's expeditions of the 1920's and 1930's brought about American participation in Antarctic exploration for the first time since Wilkes's expedition nearly a century before. Byrd established several camps, Little America being the most famous, and did most of his exploration by airplane. We open the book to his description of the discovery of Marie Byrd Land.

We succeeded in making two successful aerial casts . . . located the Rockefeller Mountains, and . . . northeast along the uncharted coast, yielded up the Edsel Ford coastal range of Marie Byrd Land. I considered the results of this flight far more important than the results of our flight to the Pole.
--From the Swan Collection.

62. DEAN C. SMITH. By the Seat of My Pants. Boston, 1961.
Dean Smith was Byrd's pilot at the time of the "discovery" of Marie Byrd Land. Although he respected many of Byrd's fine qualities, Smith also had some reservations about Byrd's character. We let the viewer judge for himself.

. . . a magnificent solitary Matterhorn of a mountain . . . far out into one of the blank spaces on the map. We kept on as far as we dared . . . told of our flight and our discovery. . .
Byrd spoke very seriously. ". . . I congratulate you gentlemen on confirming my discovery . . . almost exactly the place where I saw it this morning . . . I wanted to be sure before I announced it. Russ, you are authorized to report this to the Times. Please let me check your story before you send it."
--From the Swan Collection.

63. NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY. The Antarctic Regions. Washington, 1932.
This map reflects the information obtained by Richard Byrd in his exploration by plane. By this time the sector from the Ross Ice Shelf to the South Pole had been mapped to some degree and Sir Douglas Mawson had explored much of the coast, yet a great part of the Continent lay a mystery, and its extent was still undetermined.
--Gift of Thomas R. Adams.

64. SIR VIVIAN FUCHS and SIR EDMUND HILLARY. The Crossing of Antarctica. Boston, 1958.
The tracks [of sno-cats] on the dust cover of this book exemplify the mechanization of polar research after the second world war. The last great feat of Antarctic exploration and the quest which defeated Shackleton was the' crossing of the continent, a triumph of logistics, intelligence, and equipment.
--From the Swan Collection.

65. U.S. NAVY. HYDROGRAPHIC OFFICE. Antarctica. Ross Sea - Victoria Land. Franklin Island to McMurdo Sound. From British surveys to 1914 with additions from U. S. Navy expeditions between 1947 and 1959. Washington, 1960.
On this map Bradford Swan has indicated the paths of some of his travels the Antarctic in 1960. The land which he saw between Black Island and White Island ("Swan's Neck") has not yet been recognized by the Board of Geographic Names.
It is curious that this recent map of an area mapped so often, from Scott, 1902-1905, onward, contains notations of "source material not reconcilable."
--From the Swan Collection.

66. PEDRO FERNANDEZ DE QUIROS. The Voyages. London, Hakluyt Society, 1904. "Dedication. To Commander Robert Falcon Scott, R.N., M.V.O., F.R.G.S.; Leader of the National Antarctic Expedition, 1901 to 1904. . . ."
BISHOP JOSEPH HALL. The Discovery of a New World. Cambridge, Mass., 1937. "In Token of the Editor's Respect and Admiration to Richard Evelyn Byrd."
We conclude the exhibition with two modern research editions drawn from our own reference collection and (the Hall) from the Rockefeller Library. These editions of early works relating to the Antarctic, dedicated to modern explorers of tile Antarctic, symbolize the combination of tradition and innovation so important in the idea of Antarctic exploration.




The John Carter Brown Library's copy of 'Aurora Australis'

One book associated with Bradford Swan that resides in the John Carter Brown Library and not the John Hay Library is the 'Aurora Australis', certainly a cornerstone of any Antarctic collection (see item 40 above). Here's some information on the copy:

Brown's copy was purchased at a Sotheby's sale in 1968 for $764.40 (copies recently have fetched in excess of $50,000). (The 1968 date is probably in error as the book was in the above exhibition which was held in 1967.) I first looked at the book on February 11, 1983, and noted the call number or marking in the book as: 68-55 | 8-1-67 | Sothebys | S908 | -B862a. I also wrote down the following: Sothebys 3 + 4 July 68 #198. My second look at it was on May 3, 2002. I noted the call number as D908 | B862a. So there are some inconsistencies. This copy is known as the 'Stewed Kidneys' copy because of the marking on the packing case covers. On the inside front cover appears EWED KIDNEYS. On the inside back cover appears RCTIC 1907. The "many shekels" plate is present. There is no "propeller" in the color illustration on the title page. Rosove 304.A1b. Spence 1095. This copy has no inscriptions or signatures and is in very good condition although with three stains on the front cover and a knot hole on the upper left corner of the back cover. This copy has not been rebacked.
--R. Stephenson
(23 November 2002)

UPDATE: The 1967 edition of American Book Prices Current notes a Sotheby's auction on the 3rd and 4th of July, 1967 (not 1968). Lot 198 of that sale (July 3rd) was the Aurora Australis, which went to Maggs at 260. This sale was described as "Americana and books on voyages and travel, atlases and maps...the property of the Earl Amherst, the Royal Cornwall Yacht Club, the Devon and Exeter Institution, Commander W.D.M. Stavely and other donors."

--R. Stephenson
(18 January 2003)



BYRD POLAR RESEARCH CENTER ARCHIVAL PROGRAM, THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

The Byrd Polar Research Center Archival Program (BPRCAP) is a collaborative effort of the Byrd Polar Research Center and The Ohio State University Libraries and Archives. Its mission is to collect, preserve, and provide access to historical documents concerned with exploration and investigation of the polar regions.

The papers of Admiral Richard E. Byrd are the largest and one of the most prominent collections of the BPRCAP. Comprising more than five hundred boxes, the collection contains documentation of Byrd's five expeditions to Antarctica, to Greenland, and his flights over the North Pole and the Atlantic Ocean. In addition, the collection has materials pertaining to his family and to his participation in public life generally. The Ohio State University acquired the papers from the Byrd family, who desired that the materials be available at a university that had an active scientific program in Antarctica. The Institute of Polar Studies at the Ohio State University changed its name to the Byrd Polar Research Center to honor the explorer.

In addition to the Byrd Papers, other prominent collections held by the BPRCAP include the papers of Sir George Hubert Wilkins and the Dr. Frederick A. Cook Society Collection. Wilkins was a contemporary of Byrd's, the first to fly an airplane in Antarctica and the first to take a submarine into the Arctic. Dr. Frederick A. Cook was the first to claim to have reached the North Pole in 1908. The BPRCAP has materials of the Cook Society and of Cook's family and supporters. For the most current information about the collections held by the BPRCAP, as well as other information concerning historical polar research and exploration, please visit the web page at http://www.lib.ohio-state.edu/arvweb/polar.

The BPRCAP is located on the western edge of The Ohio State University Campus in a specially designed building. Researchers use a comfortable and secure room to study the collections and exhibits. Library and archival materials are protected in a climate-controlled building where a cooler temperature (55-60 degrees Fahrenheit) and lower humidity (40-45 %) are steadily maintained. The lights in the storage module are low ambient sodium quartz lamps. Books and manuscript materials are stored in acid-free cardboard trays or boxes. This special facility also provides protective storage for the University's archives, its John Glenn archives, and printed materials of the Libraries.

--By Laura J. Kissel/Polar Curator, Byrd Polar Research Center Archival Program, 134 University Archives, 2700 Kenny Road, Columbus, Ohio 43210.
This description appears on page 126 of "The Magic of Antarctic Colours" by Reinhard A. Krause and Lars U. Scholl. It is used here with Laura's permission.
(3 April 2005)

For information on the collections at the Archives, visit http://library.osu.edu/sites/archives/polar/collections.htm



CANTERBURY MUSEUM

Antarctic, The Journal of the New Zealand Antarctic Society (vol 20, no 3 & 4, 2003) reported:

Antarctic Artifacts Added to Museum

A train ticket issued to Captain Scott in 1910 by the Victorian railways and a rare Antarctic pamphlet organised by Shackleton were purchased by Canterbury Museum (Christchurch) in March from Bethune's auctions in Auckland using the Museum's Miss M C K Richard Bequest.

Shackleton's pamphlet The Blizzard was printed for the crew only using articles and sketches unsuitable for the Discovery Expedition's official publication The South Polar Times (1901/2).

The pamphlet belonged to dog-handler Isaac Weller and very few copies are known to exist. The pamphlet was bought for NZ$23,625 and is the only one in an Australasian public collection.

The train ticket was issued to Captain Scott when the Terra Nova arrived in Melbourne en route to Lyttelton. Scott left the ship for a fund-raising campaign and the Victorian Railways granted him free train travel between 17 and 31 October 1910.

This unique ticket was purchased at the auction for NZ $1856. Twelve other Antarctic items were also bought at the auction for NZ$5000.

(2 September 2003)



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY'S LIBRIS POLARIS

David Stam has written a very interesting paper (presented at the Grolier Club on May 11, 2009) entitled "Bassett Jones, The Grolier Club, and the 1932 Polar Exhibition: Two Thousand Items and Counting." Bassett Jones's collection—Libris Polaris—was purchased by Columbia University in 1944 or 1945.



GEORGE MARSTON COLLECTION

I doubt that it is well known that the Hampshire Record Office Archives of the Hampshire (Winchester, UK) County Council, has a collection of George Marston correspondence, many from or about Shackleton family members. It's online catalogue is at http://www3.hants.gov.uk/archives/catalog.htm. There appear to be 119 separate documents, letters, telegrams and postcards. The entries give some information such as date, addressee, date and occasionally a few details.
The first record gives this information:

Description: Correspondence and papers of George Marston, an artist, employed by Sir Ernest Shackleton (1874-1922 see DNB article) on his expeditions to the Antarctic in 1907-1909 and 1914-1916. Includes letters relating to both expeditions, general Marston family letters and some printed material relating to the Antarctic Club and Rural Industries Bureau.

AdminHistory: George Marston grew up in Portsmouth and trained to be an art teacher in London. He played a significant role in Shackleton's two antarctic expeditions and illustrated the official accounts. Between the two expeditions he married Hazel Roberts, daughter of Dr Harry Roberts of Oakshott. After the second, famous Endurance expedition, Marston returned to Oakshott and entered a second phase of his life by joining the newly created Rural Industries Bureau of which he became director in 1934. He played a major role in the national initiative to regenerate small rural craft-based industry. He died in 1940. The papers are divided into 3 sections: correspondence, personal and polar printed material and rural industries printed.

Extent: 1 box



NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA

The National Library of Australia is now making available online digitised diaries of Frank Hurley. They can be found at http://www.nla.gov.au/digital/hurleyd_brief.html

The site is introduced by the following description: "Digitise the diaries of Frank Hurley (Series 1 of the Papers of Frank Hurley, MS 883) held by the National Library of Australia. This project supports an Australian Research Council (ARC) grant awarded to Professor Robert Dixon (University of Queensland, formerly University of Southern Queensland) for a published edition of Frank Hurley's diaries. It is envisaged that the digital images and transcripts by Dixon will both be made available from the Library's website. This project also complements the recently digitised collection of Frank Hurley negatives in the Pictures collection" [See http://nla.gov.au/nla.pic-an11546686]

—Thanks to Jonathan Shackleton
(28 January 2004)



NATIONAL LIBRARY OF SCOTLAND

"The National Library of Scotland has amassed an extensive collection of printed materials on Antarctica and the sub-Antarctic regions, especially with regard to their discovery and exploration. The foundation of this collection is the personal library of Sir James Mann Wordie which was bequeathed to the Library in 1958. (Wordie Collection) The endowment fund granted to the Library by Professor Thomas Graham Brown in 1965 has enabled the Library to continue purchasing in both the mountaineering and polar fields (Graham Brown Collection)."

The Library's
Mountaineering and Polar Collections are ably described in a section of the Library's website. It's a fine collection of mostly standard works beginning with Cook and Marra and ending with Shackleton and books of that era. There are certainly some treasures in particular a copy of the Aurora Australis, first book written, illustrated, printed, bound and issued in the Antarctic. Among the ephemera are trade cards, menus and lecture programs and quite a few playbills from the Arctic. There's a copy of the very rare Catalogue of the Books of the 'Discovery' which lists the shipboard library of Scott's 'Discovery,' and four volumes of press cuttings relating to Shackleton.

The Wordie Collection itself is a important resource. It "was presented to the Library in 1959, it contains over 4,600 printed items, comprising books, journals… c. 2,000 pamphlets, 16 maps, and 68 volumes of correspondence and papers, many concerned with the Colonial Office's Discovery Committee."

—Thanks to John Bowles
(22 February 2011)



PEABODY ESSEX MUSEUM

The Peabody Essex Museum is a splendid institution in Salem, Massachusetts http://www.pem.org. It has an eclectic collection but one traditional specialty is the China trade. One of its Antarctic related treasures is an oil painting of the 'Vincennes,' Lt Charles Wilkes' ship said to have been painted by Wilkes himself.

The A. H. Waite Collection (Acquisition 19497) was donated by Waite in 1970. According to John Stewart (Antarctica--An Encyclopedia), "Amory H. 'Bud' Waite was one of the 3 who rescued Byrd in 1934, during Byrd's 1933-35 expedition. He took part in Operation Highjump, 1946-47, and during IGY (1957-58) was leader of the US Army Signal Corps Antarctic Research Team. He was communications specialist on the 'Atka' during the US Navy Antarctic Expedition of 1954-55, and on the USN Bellingshausen Sea Expedition of 1959-60."


THE A. H. WAITE COLLECTION
Note: Some items have not been included as they are exclusively of arctic or other interest. Some corrections have been made to obvious typographical errors.

M-14342. 1 tin petrol can used in the 1910 Antarctic Camp of Captain Robert Falcon Scott.
M-14344. 1 dog harness 35" long from Admiral Byrd's Antarctic Exped. #2 1933-35.
M-14345. Brass plate from a life boat built in Scotland in 1871, presumably for the ship BEAR.
M-14347. Antarctic typical black flag used by present day Ant. Expeditions.
M-14348. Ant.-typical orange flag use by present day Antarctic Exped.
M-14349. Ant. tin can containing eskimo biscuits from Scott's & Shackleton's Ant. camp 1902-7, recovered by A.H. Waite 1958-1962 7" diam 4-1/2" high.
M-14350. Remains of a blue and white cargo parachute dropped at the South Pole, approx. 9' in dia.
M-14351. Jar of sugar from Scott's 1910 base at the South Pole [sic]
M-14352. Can of Spice - from Scott's camp.
M-14353. Can of Pemmican from Scott's camp.
M-14354. Can of "Symmington's Pea Flour" from Scott's base.
M-14355. Can of cocoa from the same base.
M-14356. Ant.- can of army rations from Shackleton's 1907 base.
M-14357. Copy of ensignia of the Signal Corp Antarctic Research Team, developed by A.H. Waite 11-1/4" diameter.
M-14358. Wooden copy of an old fashioned straight razor made on the BEAR in 1933, used to initiate the "polywogs" on that equator crossing. The names of the entire crew of the ship BEAR are inscribed on the blade (damaged) 26" long.
M-14363. Piston from a Citroen engine used in the first tractor exploration of the Antarctic in 1935.
M-14365. Ant.- fragment of bottle glass, an old belt buckle, a handmade hinge, a tin can cover nad 6 nails. The glass fragment, buckle, and hinge were found at a campsite on the Northeast coast of Greenland. The tin can cover is from Etah, Greenland and the 6 nails came from Scott's base in the Antarctic.
M-14366. Ant.-part of the first antenna wire ever used in the Antarctic, used by Scott and his party in 1902, found in 1956 by A.H. Waite, (bent and twisted) approx. 30' of wire.
M-14367. Ant. and Arctic flag carried by A.H. Waite to the Arctic and Antarctic as leader of the Signal Corp Research Teams (very dilapitated).
M-14368. Ant.-Chemical jar from Scott's base with remains of specimens inside.
M-14369. Ant.-tin of waterproof matches recovered from Shackleton's 1907 house.
M-14370. Ant.-boot sole with corroded aluminum ground plates, found outside Scott's 1910 house (just remnants).
M-14371. Ant.-knife found in Scott's 1910 house by A.H. Waite in 1956, American Expeditions. 10-1/2" long.
M-14372. Ant.-windproof shirt issued to A.H. Waite at Little America in December 1933.
M-14373. Ant.-windproof shirt of the same type as above only in better condition.
M-14374. Ant.-socks of the same type of material.
M-14375. Ant.-fragment of a trail flag brought back from Little America by A.H. Waite 16 x approx. 7".
M-14376. Ant- boot strap from Scott's 1910 house.
M-14377. Ant.-fragment of a sled rope found in Scott's 1910 house 7" long.
M-14378. Ant.-spool of thread found at Shackleton's house, originally made in England before 1907. 2" spool.
M-14379. Ant.-spool of thread with a needle in it from Scott's 1910 house. 2 " spool.
M-14380. Ant.-jar of cocoa from Scott's base.
M-14381. Ant.-box containing two of the original battery cells used by Scott and his crew.
M-14382. Ant.-leather washer used on an early British ski pole to keep it from sinking too far into the ice.
M-14383. Ant.-ski strap found at Scott's base 21 " long.
M-14384. Ant.-staple from one of the ship riggings from Cape Royds, which was Shackleton's.
M-14385. A piece of the figurehead of the ship BEAR, brought back by Admiral Byrd in 1935. 11-1/2" long (this piece fits exactly with M-4396).
M-14386. Ant.wind helmet used by A.H. Waite for skiing in the Antarctic in 1933-4-5 and later in 46-47, 55-56-57.
M-14387. Ant.- a piece of the original sail of the ship DISCOVERY 190 [last digit clipped] 18-1/2" long 4" wide.
M-14388. Ant. - one of the original binding posts from one of Scott's early storage batteries.
M-14389 [and] M-14390. Ant. - a spent cartridge shell, and a small glass bottle recovered by A.H. Waite from Cape Royds, Shackleton's 1907-1915 camp.
M-14391. Ant. - bottle with an eyedropper in it, found in the Photographic laboratory of the 1910 Scott camp.
M-14392. Ant. - test tube in original wrapping paper from Scott's 1910 expedition.
M-14393. Ant. - broken glass fragment found at Scott's 1910 base weathered purple and worn by sand.
M-14394. Ant. - sugar bottle cover 3-1/2" in diameter, from Scott's 1910 base.
M-14395. Ant. - marmalade can label from Scott's 1910 base.
M-14396. Ant. - can of food recovered by A.H. Waite from Cape Royds, Shackleton's 1907 and 1915 camp.
M-14397. Ant. - gray woolen shirt made by Woods and given to the Byrd Antarctic Expedition by him, issued to A.H. Waite at Little America.
M-14398. Ant. - pair of khaki windproof trousers made for A.H. Waite.
M-14399. Ant. pair of trousers worn by A.H. Waite, patched with sheepskin on the knees and seat.
M-14400. Ant.- windproof sock of Byrd cloth used in Little America.
M-14401. Ant. - Army issue winter Arctic hat worn by A.H. Waite.
M-14402. Ant. no description.
M-14403. Ant. pair of standard army issue boots worn by A.H. Waite.
M-14404. Ant. -pair of felt innersoles used by A.H. Waite.
M-14405. Ant. -pair of air force boots issued to pilots for Arctic wear.
M-14406. Ant. -pair of bamboo ski poles used by A.H. Waite in the Antarctic in 1934 54-1/2" long.
M-14407. Ant. -Byrd issue of the early Scott man-hauling harness.
M-14408. Arct. -Standard pair of army snowshoes, developed by the Natick Laboratories, Natick, Mass. Environmental Lab. for the use of army troops in the Arctic, used by A.H. Waite 57-1/4" long.
M-14409. Ant. -Typical crampons issued to all Byrd Expedition personnel, used by A.H. Waite.
M-14411. Ant. -Box kite used by Admiral Byrd on his first Antarctic Expedition and repeated on his second expedition. It carried antenna wires aloft for better radio transmissions. . later proved unneccessary (dismantled).

NOTE: This listing of the Collection was provided by: Daniel Finamore, Ph.D., Russell W. Knight Curator of Maritime Art and History, Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970-3783. Tel: 978-745-9500. FAX: 978-744-6776. E-mail: dan_finamore@pem.org

(9 January 2005)



PLYMOUTH CITY MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY

Antarctic additions bolster Museum's collections

Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery has strengthened its collections of Antarctic material following its success at two recent auctions.

With funding support from the MLA/V&A Purchase Grant Fund, the Museum has acquired items relating to two crew members who sailed with Plymouth born Antarctic explorer Captain Robert Falcon Scott.

One item is a photographic album belonging to Patrick Keohane who served as a Petty Officer on the 'Terra Nova' Expedition of 1910-1913. The photographs reveal fascinating glimpses of everyday life on the expedition.

The Museum has also acquired a collection of items celebrating the life of Fred E. Dailey. Dailey was a carpenter on the 'Discovery' Expedition of 1901-1904. His collection includes portraits of Dailey, his Certificates of Discharge and a set of miniature medals including his Antarctic Medal and a Distinguished Service Cross awarded during the First World War.

Both Keohane and Dailey have close links with Plymouth. On first joining the Navy, aged 16, Keohane was stationed at Devonport. He later retired to the City. Dailey came to Plymouth to serve his apprenticeship as a carpenter in the Dockyard and his family settled here. He is buried at Ford Park Cemetery.

Jonathan Wilson, Collections Manager, said "We are thrilled to have been able to purchase these items. The acquisitions are an excellent complement to the items we already hold in our collections. They will help us to better highlight Plymouth's Antarctic connections and celebrate the great 'heroic age' of exploration in future exhibitions."

Existing collections at the Museum include Dailey's letter of appointment, signed by Scott and a model of the 'Terra Nova' made by Keohane. Plymouth's set of 'Scott's Skis' were given by Scott to Keohane - who later passed them to the care of the City.

A selection of the newly acquired items will be put on display at the Museum during Spring 2007.

Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery is open from 10am-5.30pm Tuesday to Friday and 10am-5pm Saturday and Bank holiday Mondays. Admission is free. For more information visit www.plymouthmuseum.gov.uk, call 01752 304774 or send an email to enquiry@plymouthmuseum.gov.uk. Please check in advance if you are making a special journey to view specific exhibits or displays or attend a specific event.

--Press Release from the Museum. Thanks to Jonathan Wilson
(16 March 2007)




ARCHIVES of the SCOTT POLAR RESEARCH INSTITUTE, Cambridge, UK.

A recent issue of Polar Bytes (No. 26, April 2003) contained the following progress report (slightly edited) from William Mills, SPRI's Librarian and Keeper of Collections, on the 'Archives Hub':

ARCHIVES HUB: A PROGRESS REPORT Friends will know that the Institute possesses a matchless Archive but how do you know exactly what is in it? Up until now, you will have been referred to the catalogue of manuscripts compiled in 1982 by then Archivist Clive Holland. This is a wonderful work of reference but SPRI has received many collections since and, of course, not every library has a copy of Clive's catalogue. Soon you will be able to use the Internet to see descriptions--not yet the originals of our very extensive Antarctic collections. The Arctic collections will follow so long as we are successful with our application to continue the project. The work is being carried out by Naomi Boneham, Assistant Archivist, with the help of Rebecca Stancombe, Librarian's Secretary.

To see the SPRI holdings, enter the Archives Hub home page (www.archiveshub.ac.uk/). Here you will read the Hub's description of itself as "A national gateway to descriptions of archives in UK universities and colleges". UK universities and colleges is underlined. Click on this and you will see the option Browse repositories: Select one.... Click on the down arrow and look for Cambridge: Scott Polar. Select this. [You will then see an underlined link: Browse Scott Polar Research Institute's descriptions. Click this and you will come to a listing of individual collections. Here you can either go to the full description or a summary.] At the time of writing (March 2003), Naomi has created 500 descriptions of which 59 have been loaded onto Archives Hub. More descriptions will follow at a rate of 30 per week, or as many as the Hub staff can handle. Our target for the end of the first year (August) is 1,000 descriptions. If we succeed in this, it will mean that the Antarctic entries are virtually complete. Rebecca's task has been to write brief biographies for the many individuals represented in the collections. As you may imagine, some of these are well-known, while others are obscure. The biographies alone will be a valuable resource, often the only reliable source of information for these persons on the Internet, while Naomi's descriptions of the collections should transform the means by which historians of polar science and exploration pursue their research.

If you would like to know more about this project, please contact me by letter or e-mail (wjm13@cam.ac.uk).

This is a VERY SIGNIFICANT step and William, Naomi and Rebecca are to be congratulated. As of today (18 April 2003) the number of records stands at 112. Far more information is included than in Holland's catalogue (see below). As William points out the biographies will prove to be very useful. The record titles are displayed in batches of 50. One has the option of either getting a summary or the full description (as a sample I've appended below the full description of the Albert Armitage collection). The records are not arranged in any discernible order although it's noted that they are "listed in order of relevance." One can search within the SPRI portion of the 'Archives Hub', but nonetheless it would be more useful to have the records arranged alphabetically by name. Let's hope that SPRI's artifact collection will be similarly available on-line soon.

Clive Holland's catalogue remains useful, of course. It's long out-of-print and it's not easy to find a copy. It was published by Garland Publishing, Inc., New York and London, in 1982. The full title: Manuscripts in the Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge, England. Edited by Clive Holland. 815 pages. It includes an extensive 'Index of Expeditions and Yoyages.' Despite the title some of the material included is at other institutions.

--R. Stephenson
(18 April 2003)



Archives Hub: Results

Albert Armitage collection


Reference:
GB 0015 Albert Armitage
Title: Albert Armitage collection
Dates of creation: 1894-1939
Held at: Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge
Extent: Expedition material and correspondence.
Name of Creator: Albert Borlase Armitage
Level of Description: fonds
Creation Information: This document was generated by Javascript from an HTML form which structured the input according to the elements of ISAD(G) Version 2.
Revisions:

Note

Descriptions compiled by N. Boneham, Assistant Archivist with reference to 'Albert Borlase Armitage and appreciation' by Frank Debenham in The Polar Record , (July 1944) volume 4 number 28 p186-187 and (May 1985) volume 22 number 140 p511-518 and Robert Keith Headland Antarctic Chronology, unpublished corrected revision of Chronological list of Antarctic expeditions and related historical events ,(1 December 2001) Cambridge University Press (1989) ISBN 0521309034


Language of Material: eng

Administrative/Biographical History

Albert Borlase Armitage was born in Scotland on 2 July 1864. He had been working for P&O for eight years when, in 1894 he joined the Jackson-Harmsworth Arctic Expedition, 1894-1897 (leader Frederick George Jackson) to Franz-Josef Land. Armitage was appointed second in command. The expedition lasted three years and Armitage took part in all the major sledging journeys. He conducted out a series of physical observations having undertaken training in meteorological and magnetic equipment prior to the expedition.

His experience gained him a place on the British National Antarctic Expedition, 1901-1904 (leader Robert Falcon Scott). Again he was appointed second in command and navigator on the Discovery . He led the first sledging party to penetrate and reach the Polar Plateau. After returning from Antarctica he worked his way up through the ranks of the merchant navy to become Commander of P&O Steam Navigation Company. He continued to write and lecture on polar exploration, while remaining in contact with polar explorers. He died on 31 October 1943.

Published work, Two years in the Antarctic, being a narrative of the British National Antarctic Expedition The Paradigm Press, Bluntisham Books, Bungay, England (1984) ISBN number 0950610453 SPRI library (*7)91(08) [1901-1904] Cadet to Commodore, an autobiography, Cassell & Co. Ltd. London (1925) SPRI library 92[Armitage, A.B.)

Scope and Content

The collection comprises of material relating to the Jackson-Harmsworth Arctic Expedition, 1894-1897 (leader Frederick George Jackson), the British National Antarctic Expedition, 1901-1904 (leader Robert Falcon Scott) and correspondence by Armitage.

System of Arrangement

The collection is split into three sub-fonds covering the Jackson-Harmsworth Arctic Expedition, 1894-1897 (leader Frederick George Jackson), the British National Antarctic Expedition, 1901-1904 (leader Robert Falcon Scott) and correspondence by Armitage.

Administrative Information

Accruals

Further accessions possible.

Access Conditions

By appointment.

Some materials deposited at the Institute are NOT owned by the Institute. In such cases the archivist will advise about any requirements imposed by the owner. These may include seeking permission to read, extended closure, or other specific conditions.

Copyright/Reproduction

Copying material by photography, electrostat, or scanning devise by readers is prohibited. The Institute may be able to provide copies of some documents on request for lodgement in publicly available repositories. This is subject to conservation requirements, copyright law, and payment of fees.

Copyright restrictions apply to most material. The copyright may lie outside the Institute and, if so, it is necessary for the reader to seek appropriate permission to consult, copy, or publish any such material. (The Institute does not seek this permission on behalf of readers). Written permission to publish material subject to the Institute's copyright must be obtained from the Director. Details of conditions and fees may be had from the Archivist

Note

Anyone wishing to consult material should ensure they note the entire MS reference and the name of the originator.

The term holograph is used when the item is wholly in the handwriting of the author. The term autograph is used when the item is signed by the author.

Further Information

Finding Aids

Clive Holland Manuscripts in the Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge, England - a catalogue . Garland Publishing New York and London (1982) ISBN 0824093941

Additional finding aids are available at the Institute.

Access Points


Armitage , Albert Borlase . ( 1864-1943 ) Captain Antarctic Explorer
Jackson-Harmsworth Arctic Expedition -- ( 1894-1897 )
British National Antarctic Expedition -- ( 1901-1904 )
Antarctica -- Discovery and exploration
Arctic regions -- Discovery and exploration

Reference:
GB 0015 Albert Armitage

Armitage, Jackson-Harmsworth Arctic Expedition


Dates of creation: 1894-1897
Extent: 68 leaves, 2 volumes and notes
Name of Creator: Albert Borlase Armitage

Administrative/Biographical History

The Jackson-Harmsworth Arctic Expedition, 1894-1897 (leader Frederick George Jackson) spent three years in Franz Joseph Land. Sledging expeditions were undertaken and the expedition met the Norwegian North Polar Expedition, 1893-1896 (leader Fridtjof Nansen) on 17 June 1896. The collection relates to Armitage's work during the expedition.

Scope and Content

68 leaves, 2 volumes, 1894-1897, notes:

System of Arrangement

Chronological.

Further Information

Related Units of Description

See SPRI collections GB 0015 Reginald Koettlitz and GB 0015 William Speirs Bruce for additional archival material held by the Institute relating to this expedition. There are several archival collections held by the Institute regarding this expedition which it is hoped will be made available on the HUB in due course.

Access Points


Jackson , Frederick George . ( d 1938 ) Arctic Explorer
Bruce , William Speirs . ( 1867-1921 ) Polar Explorer and Oceanographer
Koettlitz , Reginald . ( 1861 - 1916 )
Zemlya Frantsa-Iosifa
Northbrook Island

Reference:
GB 0015 Albert Armitage

Armitage, British National Antarctic Expedition


Extent: 6 volumes (2 journals, 3 workbooks, 1 notebook), 7 reports, 1 order, 67 leaves. Many of the items are in bound volumes. MS 641/8;MJ and MS 641/11;MJ are on microfilm.
Name of Creator: Albert Borlase Armitage

Administrative/Biographical History

The British National Antarctic Expedition, 1901-1904 (leader Robert Falcon Scott) undertook the first extensive exploration on land in Antarctica. Funding came from the Government, the Royal Society, the Royal Geographical Society and private donations. The expedition set up base at McMurdo Sound from where sledging parties carried out recognisance and scientific programmes. Scott made the fist balloon ascent on the continent in 1902. A three-man sledge party consisting of Scott, Ernest Henry Shackleton and Edward Adrian Wilson achieved a furthest south of 82.28 on 30 December 1902. The expedition ship, Discovery , commissioned and built especially for the expedition was beset in McMurdo Sound from 1902-1904.

Scope and Content

System of Arrangement

Chronological.

Further Information

Related Units of Description

See SPRI collection GB 0015 British National Antarctic Expedition, 1901-1904 for a fuller list of archival collections held by the Institute containing material on this expedition.

Access Points


Scott , Robert Falcon . ( 1868-1912 ) Captain RN Antarctic Explorer
Victoria Land (Antarctica)

Reference:
GB 0015 Albert Armitage

Armitage, correspondence


Dates of creation: 1894-1933
Extent: Circa 26 letters. MS 641/3;MJ is on microfilm.
Name of Creator: Albert Borlase Armitage

Administrative/Biographical History

The correspondence covers both the Jackson-Harmsworth Arctic Expedition, 1894-1897 (leader Frederick George Jackson) and the British National Antarctic Expedition, 1901-1904 (leader Robert Falcon Scott) and subsequent correspondence.

Scope and Content

System of Arrangement

The correspondence is arranged alphabetically by recipient.

Further Information

Related Units of Description

See separate sub-fonds for expedition material.



'FREEZE FRAME,' SCOTT POLAR RESEARCH INSTITUTE, Cambridge, UK.

SPRI, with little doubt the largest repository of polar images anywhere, has embarked on a project to conserve and digitise its collections. It's been dubbed 'Freeze Frame' and is described as follows on SPRI's website:

"The collections held by the Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge, are among the richest in the world for the study of polar environments. Work begins in April 2007 on the Freeze Frame project to capture and preserve our archive of historical images in digital form.
Our photographic negatives are a unique resource but also an extremely fragile one. We will digitise over 20,000 photographic negatives from 1845-1960, representing some of the most important visual resources for research into British and international polar exploration.
Digitisation of related documents - information from personal journals and official reports from expeditions on which these photographs were taken - will provide historical and cultural context for the images. We also intend to add context to the images by displaying them alongside selected items from our pre-eminent collection of polar fine art, prints, drawings, and manuscript materials.
The International Polar Year 2007-08 is the first of its kind for fifty years. The timing of the IPY, coupled with growing interest in climate change, provides a unique opportunity for online resources at the Scott Polar Research Institute to reach a wider learning community than ever before. The forthcoming centenaries of the 'Heroic Age' expeditions to discover the Poles also demand of us that this visual archive is accessible to a global audience.
The Freeze Frame project aims to develop an online database of freely available visual and textual resources to support learning, teaching and research into topics relating to the history of Arctic and Antarctic exploration and science. Through a series of interpretative web pages and e-learning resources the project will provide access to hidden collections for all educational levels. We will encourage users to discover polar environments through the eyes of those explorers and scientists who dared to go into the last great wildernesses on earth."
(www.spri.cam.ac.uk/resources/freezeframe)
SPRI plans to have the work completed and available by 1 March 2009. The project staff includes:
• Project Director: Professor Julian Dowdeswell
• Deputy Director: Heather Lane
• Project Manager: Naomi Boneham
• Research Curator: Dr Huw Lewis-Jones
• Digitisation Assistant: To be appointed
• Picture Library Manager: Lucy Martin
"For enquiries about the project or to be added to the project's mailing list please email museum@spri.cam.ac.uk or contact Heather Lane. We will be placing a call for participants in an online Collection Development Forum in November - please register your interest."

(29 December 2007)


THE GRIFFITH TAYLOR COLLECTION, UNIVERSITY OF NEW ENGLAND, ARMIDALE, N.S.W., AUSTRALIA

Thomas Griffith Taylor was a member of Scott's Terra Nova expedition and later led a distinguished career as a geographer. (See Wikpedia.) He married Raymond Priestley's sister. "The Griffith Taylor Collection consists of original letters, journals and sketches, copies of publications, various items of equipment and some geological specimens originally given to the Department of Geography (in 1960) by Professor Thomas Griffith Taylor." The collection now resides in the University of New England's Archives located in the Heritage Centre.

A listing of the collection has been provided by the University.

Among the important items is a copy of the Aurora Australis, photographs, a Wilson pencil sketch done at Cape Evans, Taylor's wind-proof helmet, various journals and sledge diaries and letters to and from Scott, Bowers, Priestley, Bruce, Charcot, Filchner, J.K. Davis, Edgeworth David, von Drygalski, etc.



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